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witness

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v witness be a witness to "She witnessed the accident and had to testify in court"
    • v witness perceive or be contemporaneous with "We found Republicans winning the offices","You'll see a lot of cheating in this school","The 1960's saw the rebellion of the younger generation against established traditions","I want to see results"
    • n witness testimony by word or deed to your religious faith
    • n witness a close observer; someone who looks at something (such as an exhibition of some kind) "the spectators applauded the performance","television viewers","sky watchers discovered a new star"
    • n witness someone who sees an event and reports what happened
    • n witness (law) a person who attests to the genuineness of a document or signature by adding their own signature
    • n witness (law) a person who testifies under oath in a court of law
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: In 1976, a Los Angeles secretary named Jannene Swift officially married a fifty pound rock. More than twenty people witnessed the ceremony
    • Witness Attestation of a fact or an event; testimony. "May we with . . . the witness of a good conscience, pursue him with any further revenge?""If I bear witness of myself, my witness is not true."
    • Witness One who is cognizant; a person who beholds, or otherwise has personal knowledge of, anything; as, an eyewitness; an earwitness . "Thyself art witness I am betrothed.""Upon my looking round, I was witness to appearances which filled me with melancholy and regret."
    • Witness (Law) One who sees the execution of an instrument, and subscribes it for the purpose of confirming its authenticity by his testimony; one who witnesses a will, a deed, a marriage, or the like.
    • Witness (Law) One who testifies in a cause, or gives evidence before a judicial tribunal; as, the witness in court agreed in all essential facts.
    • Witness That which furnishes evidence or proof. "Laban said to Jacob, . . . This heap be witness, and this pillar be witness ."
    • v. i Witness To bear testimony; to give evidence; to testify. "The men of Belial witnessed against him.""The witnessing of the truth was then so generally attended with this event [martyrdom] that martyrdom now signifies not only to witness, but to witness to death."
    • Witness To give testimony to; to testify to; to attest. "Behold how many things they witness against thee."
    • Witness To see or know by personal presence; to have direct cognizance of. "This is but a faint sketch of the incalculable calamities and horrors we must expect, should we ever witness the triumphs of modern infidelity.""General Washington did not live to witness the restoration of peace."
    • Witness (Law) To see the execution of, as an instrument, and subscribe it for the purpose of establishing its authenticity; as, to witness a bond or a deed.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: The smallest will ever written was 3.8 cm in diameter. It had 40 words written on it and was signed by two witnesses
    • n witness In geology, an eroded fragment of former more extensive strata, remaining in testimony of that which has departed.
    • n witness Testimony; attestation of a fact or event; evidence: often with bear: as, to bear witness.
    • n witness One who or that which bears testimony or furnishes evidence or proof.
    • n witness One who is personally present and sees some act or occurrence, or hears something spoken, and can therefore bear witness to it; a spectator.
    • n witness A sponsor, as at a baptism or christening.
    • n witness In law:
    • n witness One who gives testimony on the trial of a cause; one who appears before a court, judge, or other officer, and is examined under oath or affirmation.
    • n witness One whose testimony is offered, or desired and expected.
    • n witness One in whose presence or under whose observation a fact occurred.
    • n witness One who upon request by or on behalf of a party subscribes his name to an instrument to attest the genuineness of its execution: more exactly, an attesting witness or a subscribing witness.
    • n witness In bookbinding, an occasional rough edge on the leaf of a bound book, which is a testimony that the leaves have not been unduly trimmed.
    • witness To bear witness or testimony; give evidence; testify.
    • witness To take witness or notice.
    • witness To give testimony to; testify; bear witness of, or serve as evidence of; attest; prove; show.
    • witness [Witness in this sense is often used in the subjunctive imperatively or optatively, in many cases with inversion.
    • witness To show by one's behavior; betray as a sentiment.
    • witness To see or know by personal presence; be a witness of; observe.
    • witness To see the execution of and affix one's name to (a contract, will, or other document) for the purpose of establishing its identity: as, to witness a bond or a deed.
    • witness To foretell; presage; foretoken.
    • witness =Syn.3. Perceive, Observe, etc. See see.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: By the time a child finishes elementary school she will have witnessed 8,000 murders and 100,000 acts of violence on television.
    • n Witness wit′nes knowledge brought in proof: testimony of a fact: that which furnishes proof: one who sees or has personal knowledge of a thing: one who attests
    • v.t Witness to have direct knowledge of: to see: to give testimony to: to show:
    • v.i Witness to give evidence
    • v.t Witness (Shak.) to foretell
    • ***

Quotations

  • Benjamin Franklin
    Benjamin%20Franklin
    “Words may show a man's wit but actions his meaning.”
  • Oliver Goldsmith
    Oliver%20Goldsmith
    “I can't say whether we had more wit among us now than usual, but I am certain we had more laughing, which answered the end as well.”
  • Mao Zedong
    Mao%20Zedong
    “An army without culture is a dull-witted army, and a dull-witted army cannot defeat the enemy.”
  • Charles Caleb Colton
    Charles%20Caleb%20Colton
    “Reply to wit with gravity, and to gravity with wit.”
  • Spanish Proverb
    Spanish Proverb
    “Life without a friend is death without a witness.”
  • Pindar
    Pindar
    “The days that are still to come are the wisest witnesses.”

Idioms

At your wits' end - If you are at your wits' end, you have no idea what to do next and are very frustrated.
***
Brevity is the soul of wit - The best way to communicate intelligently is to be concise and not to use unnecessary words.
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Mother wit - Native intelligence; common sense
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
AS. witness, gewitnes, from witan, to know. √133. See Wit (v. i.)

Usage

In literature:

They were expecting Him to return as a result of this witnessing of theirs.
"Quiet Talks on the Crowned Christ of Revelation" by S. D. Gordon
The Lord gains a witness, and a stalwart witness too!
"My Daily Meditation for the Circling Year" by John Henry Jowett
She also stood very much in awe of Miss Metoaca's ready wit and formidable tongue.
"The Lost Despatch" by Natalie Sumner Lincoln
And wit must be foiled by wit; cut a diamond with a diamond, no other way, i'gad.
"The Comedies of William Congreve Volume 1 [of 2]" by William Congreve
He had now, what wits and philosophers have often wished, the power of passing the day in contemplative tranquillity.
"The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. in Nine Volumes" by Samuel Johnson
Their robes were more showy than any court-dress ever witnessed at Windsor Castle or the Tuileries.
"The Adventures of the Chevalier De La Salle and His Companions, in Their Explorations of the Prairies, Forests, Lakes, and Rivers, of the New World, and Their Interviews with the Savage Tribes, Two Hundred Years Ago" by John S. C. Abbott
Mrs. Bethune now took the witness stand, and she was asked by Mr. Howe how long she had known Hemmings, the prisoner at the bar?
"Danger! A True History of a Great City's Wiles and Temptations" by William Howe
Why, why has he not the wit of Asad son of Costantin?
"The Valley of the Kings" by Marmaduke Pickthall
Witness, attend, and answer directly.
"The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 108, October, 1866" by Various
A fule's wit is worth more nor a wise man's folly.
"Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 2 (of 2)" by John Roby
He was already familiar with most of the evidence: he knew what each witness was likely to tell before one or other entered the box.
"In the Mayor's Parlour" by J. S. (Joseph Smith) Fletcher
By statute the names of two witnesses are required, and when omitted the deed is not only defective, but in some states at least is void.
"Putnam's Handy Law Book for the Layman" by Albert Sidney Bolles
If I bear witness of Myself, My witness is not true.
"The Expositor's Bible: The Gospel of St. John, Vol. I" by Marcus Dods
Lucy, however, had wits, and inexperienced wits are as a little knowledge.
"The Ordeal of Richard Feverel" by George Meredith
He could not so properly be said to have a Wit very much raised, as a plain, gaining, well-bred, recommending kind of Wit.
"A Character of King Charles the Second" by George Savile, Marquis of Halifax
Two witnesses are required.
"Marriage and Divorce Laws of the World" by Hyacinthe Ringrose
She was content to be a silent witness.
"The Way of the Strong" by Ridgwell Cullum
Hast lost thy five wits?
"The MS. in a Red Box" by John Arthur Hamilton
What high commotion did the next day witness!
"The Deemster" by Hall Caine
These facts were given by an eye witness who afterwards took the revolver from Leonard.
"The Pullman Boycott" by W. F. Burns
***

In poetry:

"He's in this room." His dreamy, clear,
Large eyes look round for God:
In vain they search, in vain they peer;
His wits are all abroad!
"The Shadows" by George MacDonald
The mean diet, no dainty fare;
True wisdom joined with simpleness;
The night discharged of all care,
Where wine the wit may not oppress;
"The Things That Cause A Quiet Life" by Henry Howard
God's witnesses, a glorious host,
Compass him daily like a cloud;
Martyrs and seers, the saved and lost,
Mercies and judgments cry aloud.
"St. Bartholomew" by John Keble
The lover of her body sware:
"Though she should hate me, wit you well,
Rather than yield one kiss of her
I give my soul to burn in hell."
"The Two Lovers" by Richard Hovey
I bade men tell me which in brief,
Which is fairer, flower or leaf.
They did not have the wit to say,
Leaves by night and flowers by day.
"Leaves Compared With Flowers" by Robert Frost
It's showing the children how to go,
To witness a part of His love,
And if we will seek Him here below,
We will see Him and hear Him above.
"Children's Day. I John, 4:4" by Frank Barbour Coffin

In news:

Police said that Dennison was apprehended by witnesses as he ran through the parking lot.
The witness said Kidd used the cell phone to arrange a meeting between DeGrasse and Kidd's cousin Darrell Scott, 44, from Alabama, under the premise that Scott would give her money to bring to Kidd in Trenton State Prison.
Iraq Vets Bear Witness The Nation.
Tucson News NowNC man found guilty in plot to behead witnesses.
A former Republican candidate for US Senate and West Virginia attorney general has been arrested and charged with trying to intimidate a witness.
George Clooney, Elisabetta Canalis on Berlusconi Sex Trial Witness List.
But I remember how to die Though all my witnesses are dead.
Witnesses in two canoes and a kayak saw the victim in the water and paddled over, pulling him out of the lake.
This classic work of British literature sparkles with wit as it offers keen insight into the ageless nature of mankind.
8-year-old Caped Crusader alerts adult after witnessing house fire.
Wit, Wisdom, and One Very Drunk Puppet.
Chanticleer 's two executive directors, Bill Thomas and Chris Woods before him, added color, hot plants, artistry, wit and savvy.
To wit "I don't think I'm direct and honest," says Barlow.
A Fearless Witness of Faith in Christ.
This week, early risers will have the opportunity to witness a striking conjunction between our "morning star" Venus and the waning crescent moon.
***

In science:

Now the probability of missing all xi = 1 for i ∈ Sˆj in identifying the witness 2 .
On Distributed Computation in Noisy Random Planar Networks
As discussed above, the steep temperature profiles predicte d in the central regions witness the presence of overcooling.
Thermodynamical properties of the ICM from hydrodynamical simulations
Suppose U is meager in Y and let (cid:0)Y (t)(cid:1)t∈K be a witness of this fact.
Definably complete and Baire structures and Pfaffian closure
Hence, (cid:0)X (t)(cid:1)t∈K is a witness of the fact that U is meager in itself.
Definably complete and Baire structures and Pfaffian closure
Hence, (cid:0)Y (t)(cid:1)t∈K is a witness of the fact that U is meager in Y .
Definably complete and Baire structures and Pfaffian closure
Let G be N, acting on S by n(s, m) := (s, m + n), let Nt be a sequence of integers witnessing that g is a weak limit point, and let It := [0, Nt ].
A General Correspondence between Averages and Integrals
Indeed, using entanglement witnesses it has been shown that the detection of entanglement in a sufficiently complex state gets exponentially hard with increasing number of particles .
Initial-state randomness as a universal source of decoherence
Let K be a separable Rosenthal compact, C an analytic subspace of K and {fn}n a countable dense subset of K witnessing the analyticity of C .
A classification of separable Rosenthal compacta and its applications
Let K be a separable Rosenthal compact, C an analytic subspace of K and {fn}n a countable dense subset of K witnessing the analyticity of C .
A classification of separable Rosenthal compacta and its applications
The function 0 is the only non-Gδ point of ˆA(2N ) and this is witnessed in the most extreme way.
A classification of separable Rosenthal compacta and its applications
Hence the set A witness the analyticity of C . (3) Let D1 be a countable dense subset of K and D2 a countable dense subset of C .
A classification of separable Rosenthal compacta and its applications
Let f = {fn}n be a countable dense subset of K and A ⊆ [N] witnessing the analyticity of C .
A classification of separable Rosenthal compacta and its applications
Let also {fn}n be a countable dense subset of K and A ⊆ [N] analytic, witnessing the analyticity of C .
A classification of separable Rosenthal compacta and its applications
Let {fn}n be a countable dense subset of K and A ⊆ [N] witnessing the analyticity of C .
A classification of separable Rosenthal compacta and its applications
Let {fn}n be a countable dense subset of K and A ⊆ [N] analytic, witnessing the analyticity of C .
A classification of separable Rosenthal compacta and its applications
***