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vocal

Definitions

  • A View of the Vocal Cords
    A View of the Vocal Cords
  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj vocal given to expressing yourself freely or insistently "outspoken in their opposition to segregation","a vocal assembly"
    • adj vocal full of the sound of voices "a playground vocal with the shouts and laughter of children"
    • adj vocal having or using the power to produce speech or sound "vocal organs","all vocal beings hymned their praise"
    • adj vocal relating to or designed for or using the singing voice "vocal technique","the vocal repertoire","organized a vocal group to sing his compositions"
    • n vocal a short musical composition with words "a successful musical must have at least three good songs"
    • n vocal music intended to be performed by one or more singers, usually with instrumental accompaniment
    • ***

Additional illustrations & photos:

The Different Positions of the Vocal Cords The Different Positions of the Vocal Cords

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Cats have over one hundred vocal sounds, dogs only have about ten
    • Vocal (R. C. Ch) A man who has a right to vote in certain elections.
    • Vocal (Phon) A vocal sound; specifically, a purely vocal element of speech, unmodified except by resonance; a vowel or a diphthong; a tonic element; a tonic; -- distinguished from a subvocal, and a nonvocal.
    • Vocal (Phon) Consisting of, or characterized by, voice, or tone produced in the larynx, which may be modified, either by resonance, as in the case of the vowels, or by obstructive action, as in certain consonants, such as v l, etc., or by both, as in the nasals m n ng; sonant; intonated; voiced. See Voice, and Vowel, also Guide to Pronunciation, §§ 199-202.
    • Vocal Of or pertaining to a vowel or voice sound; also, spoken with tone, intonation, and resonance; sonant; sonorous; -- said of certain articulate sounds.
    • Vocal (Phon) Of or pertaining to a vowel; having the character of a vowel; vowel.
    • Vocal Of or pertaining to the voice or speech; having voice; endowed with utterance; full of voice, or voices. "To hill or valley, fountain, or fresh shade,
      Made vocal by my song."
    • Vocal Uttered or modulated by the voice; oral; as, vocal melody; vocal prayer. "Vocal worship."
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: Giraffes have no vocal chords.
    • vocal Pertaining to the voice, to speech, or to song; uttered or modulated by the voice,oral.
    • vocal Having a voice; endowed, or as if endowed, with a voice; possessed of utterance or audible expression.
    • vocal In phonetics: Voiced; uttered with voice as distinct from breath; sonant: said of certain alphabetic sounds or letters, as z or v or b as distinguished from s or f or p respectively Having a vowel character or function; vowel.
    • vocal In zoöl, voiced; uttered by the mouth; formed in the vocal organs: distinguished from sonorific: noting the cries of animals, as distinguished from the mechanical noises they may make, as the stridulation of an insect.
    • n vocal In the Roman Catholic Church, a man who has a right to vote in certain elections.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Hippopotamuses do 80% of their vocalizations underwater.
    • adjs Vocal having a voice: uttered or changed by the voice:
    • adjs Vocal (phon.) voiced, uttered with voice: having a vowel function
    • ***

Quotations

  • Scottie Pippen
    Scottie Pippen
    “I've always led by example and I'm not that vocal.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. vocalis, fr. vox, vocis, voice: cf. F. vocal,. See Voice, and cf. Vowel
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. vocabulumvocāre, to call.

Usage

In literature:

Nor are we lacking in vocal talent.
"The Bay State Monthly, Vol. II, No. 6, March, 1885" by Various
He composed all kinds of music, instrumental and vocal, symphonies, operas, etc.
"Beethoven" by George Alexander Fischer
He was a lifelong friend of Christine Nilsson whom he considered the greatest vocal and dramatic genius of the age.
"Memories and Anecdotes" by Kate Sanborn
America is not all of it vocal just now.
"New York Times Current History; The European War, Vol 2, No. 3, June, 1915" by Various
Voice is sound vibration produced by the vocal cords, these being two ligaments in the larynx.
"Cyclopedia of Telephony & Telegraphy Vol. 1" by Kempster Miller
She stared an instant then most astonishingly smiled, a smile that seemed almost vocal with many glad words.
"Bunker Bean" by Harry Leon Wilson
It has a wilderness of windpipes, each furnished with its own vocal adjustment, or larynx.
"Atlantic Monthly, Volume 12, No. 73, November, 1863" by Various
It remained for Tasso to give that magic of the senses vocal utterance.
"Renaissance in Italy, Volumes 1 and 2" by John Addington Symonds
All music is originally vocal.
"Essays on Education and Kindred Subjects" by Herbert Spencer
At a subsequent period of his history Nandy's vocal efforts surprised even his daughter.
"Charles Dickens and Music" by James T. Lightwood
They make themselves the vocal sun-glasses of God.
"The House of the Vampire" by George Sylvester Viereck
In this are the vocal cords.
"Public Speaking" by Clarence Stratton
Oral language consists of variations and mutations of vocal sounds produced as signs of thought and emotion.
"Sign Language Among North American Indians Compared With That Among Other Peoples And Deaf-Mutes" by Garrick Mallery
The vocal parts, always natural, never trivial, give expression to the words without ceasing to be melodious.
"Great Italian and French Composers" by George T. Ferris
It was not from any lack of technical knowledge and vocal skill that Mme.
"Great Singers, First Series" by George T. Ferris
Her delivery of 'Casta Diva' is a transcendent effort of vocalization.
"Great Singers, Second Series" by George T. Ferris
Vocal work with closed mouth is also a powerful auxiliary to vocal agility.
"Caruso and Tetrazzini on the Art of Singing" by Enrico Caruso and Luisa Tetrazzini
The notes of the instrumental accompaniment were still different from those of the vocal part.
"A Popular History of the Art of Music" by W. S. B. Mathews
Shann's protest became vocal.
"Storm Over Warlock" by Andre Norton
The idea of mechanical vocal control is also the starting-point of all analysis of the vocal action.
"The Psychology of Singing" by David C. Taylor
***

In poetry:

She tells me how with eager speed
He flew to hear my vocal reed;
And how, with critic face profound,
And steadfast ear, devour'd the sound.
"The Dying Kid" by William Shenstone
When Sappho struck the quivering wire,
The throbbing breast was all on fire:
And when she raised the vocal lay,
The captive soul was charm'd away!
"Verses On A Young Lady (playing harpsichord, and singing)" by Tobias Smollett
The leaves are flutter'd by no tell-tale gales,
Clear melts the azure in the rosy west,
Scarce heard, the river winds along the vales,
And Eve has lull'd the vocal grove to rest.
"Sonnet I" by Sir John Carr
To carve your loves, to paint your mutual flames,
See, polish'd fair, the beech's friendly rind!
To sing soft carols to your lovely dames,
See vocal grots and echoing vales assign'd!
"Elegy IX. He Describes His Disinterestedness to a Friend" by William Shenstone
GAY Annandale, with fields so fair,
And pleasant hills, and valleys there;
Resounding groves, none can compare,
When nature crowns;
They join the warblers in the air,
With vocal sounds.
"The Praise Of B----" by Susannah Hawkins
Awhile he ceased; far scorching woe
Had made a drought of vocal flow;
When hungry, weary, desolate,
A fox crept home to his defis gate.
The sight brought Adam's memory back,
And touched him with a keener lack.
"Mount Arafa" by Richard Doddridge Blackmore

In news:

Amy winehouse rehab (hot chip vocal) rehab.
Other than the fact that it wasn't Omaha, the 12-member vocal ensemble Chanticleer put on a show Monday that was close to perfection.
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Singer Celine Dion says she is recovering from a virus that caused an inflammation of her vocal cords and is planning to return to the stage in Las Vegas soon.
Cats top Northwood, test Calipari's vocal cords .
In the case that surgery is needed, doctors attempt to change the position of the paralyzed vocal cord to improve the voice.
Yankees' Rivera may need surgery on vocal cords .
Mariano Rivera's right arm appears to be ageless, but the same cannot be said about his vocal cords .
There's a new video out for Nas' "Cherry Wine," featuring vocals from the late Amy Winehouse.
Rick Hayman on guitar and vocals.
Elastica were a Britpop band formed in London, England in 1992 and made up of: Justine Frischmann (vocals and guitar), Donna Matthews (guitar and vocals), Annie Holland (bass), and Justin Welch (drums).
In one part of his act, Travalena physically and vocally "morphed" into all of the US presidents, from.
Will his vocal support boost Mr Obama's reelection odds.
Be more vocal in defending prayer and other letters to the editors.
The local spaced out electronica duo just released "Open Shadow," its latest 7-inch, featuring a lead vocal from Title Tracks frontman John Davis .
Florence Welch suffers vocal injury, cancels shows.
***

In science:

The major difference with regular usability testing is that a person acts as the computer, changing screens, vocalizing error messages, etc.
Internet Banking System Prototype
Agoramoorthy. Efficiency of coding in macaque vocal communication.
Information content versus word length in random typing
When this pressure drop becomes sufficiently large, the vocal folds start to vibrate.
Music in Terms of Science
The motion of vibrating vocal folds is mostly lateral with almost no motion along the length of the vocal folds.
Music in Terms of Science
The vocal folds will not vibrate if they are not sufficiently close to one another, or not under the appropriate amount of tension, or not having sufficient pressure drop across the larynx.
Music in Terms of Science
When they vibrate, the vocal folds are capable of producing several different vibratory patterns.
Music in Terms of Science
Vocal registers arise from different vibratory patterns in the vocal folds.
Music in Terms of Science
The other three forms are known as vocal fry, falsetto, and whistle.
Music in Terms of Science
Arranged by the pitch areas covered, vocal fry is the lowest register, modal voice is next, then falsetto, and finally the whistle register.
Music in Terms of Science
The essential difference between the modal and falsetto registers lies in the amount and type of vocal fold involvement.
Music in Terms of Science
With proper vocal training, it is possible for most women to develop this part of voice.
Music in Terms of Science
Individuals can develop their voices further through the careful and systematic practice of both songs and vocal exercises (usually under experienced instructors in an intelligent manner).
Music in Terms of Science
Unlike the harmonica, the accordion is blown mechanically and the reeds do not couple the the vocal tract of the player.
Music in Terms of Science
Among the people arguing vocally on the other side were Holger Nielsen and Gerard ’t Hooft.
Theoretical Summary Lecture for EPS HEP99
Maximum Lyapunov Exponent was used to reconstruct the dynamic of the vocal folds.
Characterization of chaotic dynamics in the vocalization of Cervus elaphus corsicanus
***