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  • First two stanzas
    First two stanzas
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n stanza a fixed number of lines of verse forming a unit of a poem
    • ***

Additional illustrations & photos:

Third stanza, surrounded by branches Third stanza, surrounded by branches
Fourth stanza, surrounded by flowers Fourth stanza, surrounded by flowers
Fourth stanza, surrounded by oak leaves Fourth stanza, surrounded by oak leaves
Fifth stanza, surrounded by apple blossoms Fifth stanza, surrounded by apple blossoms
Sixth stanza, surrounded by hibiscus flowers Sixth stanza, surrounded by hibiscus flowers
Seventh stanza, surrounded by lilies of the valley Seventh stanza, surrounded by lilies of the valley
A woman leans against a wall that encases the Eigth stanza A woman leans against a wall that encases the Eigth stanza

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Stanza A number of lines or verses forming a division of a song or poem, and agreeing in meter, rhyme, number of lines, etc., with other divisions; a part of a poem, ordinarily containing every variation of measure in that poem; a combination or arrangement of lines usually recurring, whether like or unlike, in measure. "Horace confines himself strictly to one sort of verse, or stanza, in every ode."
    • Stanza (Arch) An apartment or division in a building; a room or chamber.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n stanza Pl. stanze (-ze). In architecture, an apartment or division in a building; a room or chamber: as, the stanze of Raphael in the Vatican.
    • n stanza In versification, a series of lines arranged in a fixed order of sequence as regards their length, metrical form, or rimes, and constituting a typical group, or one of a number of similar groups, composing a poem or part of a poem. Stanza is often used interchangeably with strophe—strophe, however, being used preferably of ancient or quantitative, and stanza of modern or accentual and rimed poetry. In the latter the stanza often consists of lines identical in form throughout, the arrangement of rimes alone defining the group of lines. Such a stanza is not properly a strophe. A couplet is not regarded as a stanza, and a triplet is rarely so designated. Compare verse. Abbreviated st.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Stanza stan′za a series of lines or verses connected with and adjusted to each other in a fixed order of sequence as regards length and metrical form: a division of a poem containing every variation of measure in the poem
    • ***


  • Ralph Waldo Emerson
    “A character is like an acrostic or Alexandrian stanza; read it forward, backward, or across, it still spells the same thing.”


Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
It. stanza, a room, habitation, a stanza, i. e., a stop, fr. L. stans, p. pr. of stare, to stand. See Stand, and cf. Estancia Stance Stanchion
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
It. stanza, a stop—Low L. stantia—L. stāre, stand.


In literature:

Canto Six, Stanza Seventeen.
"The Fourth R" by George Oliver Smith
At the end of the first stanza he gave a long sigh, and then he was silent to the close.
"A Pair of Patient Lovers" by William Dean Howells
I will not continue the stanza, because it contains the worst rhyme that Thackeray ever permitted himself to use.
"Thackeray" by Anthony Trollope
There was an absence in them of "the pomps and prodigality" of genius of which Gray spoke in a noble stanza.
"Some Diversions of a Man of Letters" by Edmund William Gosse
I can repeat hundreds of them still, with the exception of here and there a stanza or two.
"Modern Skepticism: A Journey Through the Land of Doubt and Back Again" by Joseph Barker
His perfect reading gave the commonplace stanzas aesthetic effect.
"A Dream of Empire" by William Henry Venable
Poliziano's treatment of the octave stanza for Rispetti was comparatively popular.
"Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete" by John Symonds
The fifty or more stanzas of his "Gates of Silence" are probably far less well known.
"The Last Harvest" by John Burroughs
The stanzas reminded him forcibly of one of the greatest poets of the century.
"The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 20, No. 117, July, 1867." by Various
The first stanza alone is mediaeval, the remaining six of the hymn are Luther's.
"Christmas in Ritual and Tradition, Christian and Pagan" by Clement A. Miles
Susan learned the first two stanzas, and Lucy picked up the air and a few words.
"The Emigrant Trail" by Geraldine Bonner
In hymn 14 there are three stanzas (10-12) that deal with the two dogs of Yama.
"Cerberus, The Dog of Hades" by Maurice Bloomfield
John smiled wanly as he drifted slowly into his next stanza.
"The Southerner" by Thomas Dixon
Perhaps the noblest stanzas in our language.
"The Golden Treasury" by Various
The cheering was deafening after each stanza was sung.
"Sixty Years of California Song" by Margaret Blake-Alverson
The first stanza of the Italian text will serve to show the form.
"Some Forerunners of Italian Opera" by William James Henderson
The notable deed of Witherington (stanza 54) has many parallels.
"Ballads of Scottish Tradition and Romance" by Various
The title is French but this might have been retained for the German stanzas.
"Translations of German Poetry in American Magazines 1741-1810" by Edward Ziegler Davis
I do not know whether this is due to a false note towards the end of the second stanza, or to a disagreement between the second and third stanzas.
"From a Cornish Window" by Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch
The poem often falls into two or three main divisions, into which the various stanzas may be grouped.
"Ontario Teachers' Manuals: Literature" by Ontario Ministry of Education

In poetry:

Trust not to them who say,
In stanzas, they adore thee;
Oh rather sleep in churchyard clay,
With urn and cherub o'er thee!
"The Poet’s Lot" by Oliver Wendell Holmes
Farewell, I said, to blooming Nell,
Who is too long my passion trying,
For here is one, whose stanzas tell,
Like me, for marriage she is dying.
"To Lizzie" by James Avis Bartley
'Get that shoulder under your stanzas
And we'll be away.' Deep in the cave of your ear
The goblin snapped his fingers.
So what had I given him?
"The Minotaur" by Ted Hughes
As soon as thou hadst thy design exprest,
Immediately I granted thy request,
And strove those sacred precepts to restrain
In artless Stanza's, and in language plain.
"The Author's Letter To A Clergyman, Who Had Desired Him To Put The Catechism Of The Church Of Englan" by Rees Prichard
Thanks for your stanzas, Lucy,
My sister dear in song!
How many pleasant fancies
With these sweet numbers throng,
Which, like spring's tuneful brooklets,
Trip merrily along.
"Lucy." by George Pope Morris
And though no temple richly drest,
Nor sacrifice is here;
We'll make his temple in our breast,
And offer up a tear.
'The first stanza repeated by the Chorus.
"The Captivity" by Oliver Goldsmith

In news:

Its honesty, candor and arrangment into three-line stanzas make it a pleasure to read.
The first stanza of this poem about how a "beamish" boy slew the Jabberwock is familiar to many.
The Ladyjacks (2-0) outscored the Maidens 24-8 in the second stanza and eventually went on to win 49-35.
Silver Lake poetry box wins fans, stanza by stanza .
TechCrunch reports that Stanza 's developers, Lexcycle, received a call from Apple to demand the removal of the feature, for reasons that could not be publicly disclosed.
For a long while, Stanza was the iPhone's answer to the Amazon Kindle.
Stanza 's main Library page offers three sections of menu choices.
But although Classics presents its titles beautifully, its selection is much more limited than Stanza 's.
Holding onto a slim 21-20 lead going deep into the final stanza, the Mount Union defense stood tall not once but twice to hold off old nemesis Huntingdon on the opening night of high school football Friday at the Trojans' home field.
Robert Frost is one of the true icons of American poetry and one of his best poems begins with a stanza that is very telling, not only of life, but also of a visit to Napa Valley, Calif, if you only have one day to spend.
Yeats published his great stanzas about Lady Gregory in "Coole Park, 1929".
BENSENVILLE, Illinois (October 5th) – After the game was knotted-up at one after two periods, the Lumberjacks decided that it was time to turn on the gas pedal as they scored two goals in the final stanza to defeat the Chicago Steel, 3-1.
The Quakers managed to record double digits in a quarter just once and were held to just two points in the opening stanza.
Tazewell (2-3) used a 10-0 run at the start of the final stanza to break open a six-point game and roll to the win.