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cottar

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n cottar fastener consisting of a wedge or pin inserted through a slot to hold two other pieces together
    • n cottar a peasant farmer in the Scottish Highlands
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Cottar A cottager; a cottier. "Through Sandwich Notch the West Wind sang
      Good morrow to the cotter ."
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n cottar A Scotch spelling of cotter.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Cottar kot′ėr (Scot.) a peasant occupying a cot or cottage for which he has to give labour
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
LL. cotarius, cottarius, coterius,. See Cot

Usage

In literature:

There were many lendermen, and a great many powerful bondes; but the great mass consisted of labourers and cottars.
"Heimskringla" by Snorri Sturlason
It was the abode of a cottar, and was a dependency of the farm he had just left.
"Sir Gibbie" by George MacDonald
It was the dwelling of a cottar, whose family had been settled upon the farm of Bodyfauld from time immemorial.
"Robert Falconer" by George MacDonald
Cottar, major, went the way of hundreds before him.
"The Day's Work, Volume 1" by Rudyard Kipling
Then perhaps I may find a cottar's croft somewhere and settle down and marry a dairymaid.
"The Great Hunger" by Johan Bojer
I know his father; a mere cottar.
"Corporal Cameron" by Ralph Connor
Ye have riven the thack off seven cottar houses; look if your ain roof-tree stand the faster.
"Guy Mannering, or The Astrologer, Complete, Illustrated" by Sir Walter Scott
From Burns' 'Cottar's Saturday Night.
"The Prose Works of William Wordsworth" by William Wordsworth
He bade ower i' yon cottar hoose, wast a bittie frae the Whin Inn.
"My Man Sandy" by J. B. Salmond
Here are few cottars without a cow, and some of them two.
"A Tour in Ireland 1776-1779" by Arthur Young
The gentleman told me, in the course of the evening, that his father was a poor cottar in Sutherlandshire.
"The Celtic Magazine, Vol. 1, No. 1, November 1875" by Various
Love is as warm amang cottars as courtiers.
"The Proverbs of Scotland" by Alexander Hislop
The cottars of the neighbouring village were on other accounts in more than usually depressed circumstances at the time.
"My Schools and Schoolmasters" by Hugh Miller
Three contracts that are reversed by the decision of a judge: the contracts of a woman, of a son, of a cottar.
"The Triads of Ireland" by Kuno Meyer
He was now obliged to take shelter with his family in an outhouse, which had been occupied by a cottar.
"Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland" by Various
The widow with the prostitute, the aged cottar with the aged vagrant.
"Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Vol. 60, No. 373, November 1846" by Various
Poor cottars killed and hamlets burned, in pure sport!
"The Abbess Of Vlaye" by Stanley J. Weyman
The weet's nae harm tae cottar folks' bairns, they're aye plouterin' e'y burns, an' it juist keeps them caller.
"Inchbracken" by Robert Cleland
Below these larger villein holders came a class called coliberts, cottars or bordars, who held about five acres of land each.
"The Story of an Ancient Parish" by H. R. Coulthard
Indeed, according to Smiles, if a cottar lost a horse, it was not unusual for him to marry a wife as the cheapest substitute.
"Makers of Modern Agriculture" by William Macdonald
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In poetry:

Three pennies, maybe four, a day
The cottar gat for toilin',
In fiel' or fauld, at dyke or sheugh,
Wi' muckle care an' moilin.
"Ballad of The Monkland Cottar" by Janet Hamilton
"The cottar faither, weak wi' want,
Wad stacher to the farmer's ha',
A scone or twa the wife wad gie,
If she had ocht to spare ava.
"Grannie's Crack Aboot The Famine In Auld Scotlan' In 1739-40" by Janet Hamilton
"The frost lay a' that winter thro';
The yird was hard as ony stane;
An' famine to the cottars cam',
An' crined them doun to skin an' bane.
"Grannie's Crack Aboot The Famine In Auld Scotlan' In 1739-40" by Janet Hamilton
Said grannie, "Whan I was a lass in my teens,
Ne'er thinkin' what pinchin' or poverty means,
There leev'd, within cry o' my ain faither's door,
A cottar, his wife, wi' their young bairnies four.
"Grannie's Tale: A Ballad o'Memorie" by Janet Hamilton
Juist think gif the "Cottar's ain Saturday Nicht"
War stripped o' the Doric, wi' English bedicht—
To the leal Scottish heart it wad ne'er be the same;
Wi' sic truth and sic feeling' it wadna strike hame.
"A Plea For The Deric" by Janet Hamilton

In news:

Kenya is Home to Cottar's 1920?s Safari Camp.
Romantic Safari at Cottar's.
Cottar's 1920s Safari Camp in Kenya offers couples and honeymooners a variety of romantic activities to choose from.
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