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banker

Definitions

  • Shorty Settles With the Banker. 51
    Shorty Settles With the Banker. 51
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n banker the person in charge of the bank in a gambling game
    • n banker a financier who owns or is an executive in a bank
    • ***

Additional illustrations & photos:

Hannibal requesting the Cretan Priests to become his Bankers Hannibal requesting the Cretan Priests to become his Bankers
A banker trying to convince a man to invest in the 'El Fabuloso silver mine A banker trying to convince a man to invest in the 'El Fabuloso silver mine

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The traditional symbol of the pawnbroker—three golden balls—is thought to be derived from the coat of the arms of the Medici family, who ruled Italian city of Florence between the 15th and 16th centuries. The symbol was spread by the Lombards—Italian bankers, goldsmiths, and moneylenders who set up businesses in medieval London.
    • Banker A ditcher; a drain digger.
    • Banker A money changer. "In the face of these guilty collybists ."
    • Banker A vessel employed in the cod fishery on the banks of Newfoundland.
    • Banker One who conducts the business of banking; one who, individually, or as a member of a company, keeps an establishment for the deposit or loan of money, or for traffic in money, bills of exchange, etc.
    • Banker The dealer, or one who keeps the bank in a gambling house.
    • Banker The stone bench on which masons cut or square their work.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n banker A vessel employed in the cod-fishery on the banks of Newfoundland.
    • n banker The bench or table upon which bricklayers and stone-masons prepare and shape their material; a banket.
    • n banker In sculpture, a modeler's bench provided with a circular platform turning on wheels so that the work can be revolved to expose any portion to the light.
    • n banker A covering for a bench or seat, made of tapestry, rich stuff, or embroidered cloth.
    • n banker A hanging for a church wall or screen; specifically, the curtains placed at the ends of an altar.
    • n banker A ditcher; one engaged in embanking.
    • n banker In hunting, a horse which can jump on and off field-banks too large to be cleared.
    • n banker In Australia, a river full to the brim.
    • n banker One who keeps a bank; one who traffics in money, receives and remits money, negotiates bills of exchange, etc.
    • n banker The holder of the funds of a gaming establishment; in games of chance, that player who deposits a certain sum of money against which bets are made, or that player who for the sake of convenience receives and pays out bets won and lost.
    • n banker One who makes a business of picking up wreckage on the coast.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Banker one who keeps a bank: one employed in banking business:—fem. Bank′eress
    • ***

Quotations

  • Lord Hanson
    Lord Hanson
    “Always be nice to bankers. Always be nice to pension fund managers. Always be nice to the media. In that order.”
  • John Berryman
    John Berryman
    “Bats have no bankers and they do not drink and cannot be arrested and pay no tax and, in general, bats have it made.”
  • James Buchan
    James Buchan
    “Because bankers measure their self-worth in money, and pay themselves a lot of it, they think they're fine fellows and don't need to explain themselves.”
  • Jaffar Hussein
    Jaffar Hussein
    “Good bankers, like good tea, can only be appreciated when they are in hot water.”
  • Lord Longford
    Lord Longford
    “With a group of bankers I always had the feeling that success was measured by the extent one gave nothing away.”
  • Mark Twain
    Mark%20Twain
    “A banker is a fellow who lends his umbrella when the sun is shining and wants it back the minute it begins to rain.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
See the nouns Bank and the verbs derived from them
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. banque, of Teut. origin, cog. with two foregoing words.

Usage

In literature:

Hugh McCulloch, of Indiana, who became Secretary of the Treasury in 1865, was a banker of long experience and success.
"The New Nation" by Frederic L. Paxson
Neale told all he knew: the banker listened in his usual fashion, keeping his eyes steadily fixed on his informant.
"The Chestermarke Instinct" by J. S. Fletcher
Through a glass panel in his room, the banker's son watched the departure of Dick Swinton with considerable satisfaction.
"The Scarlet Feather" by Houghton Townley
On one occasion he dined with a numerous party at a banker's in the city.
"Louis Philippe" by John S. C. (John Stevens Cabot) Abbott
My father was a banker.
"A Romantic Young Lady" by Robert Grant
The banker waved the objection away a little petulantly.
"Aladdin of London" by Sir Max Pemberton
She had not left her writing-table since she had read the letter of her bankers, Messieurs Barbey-Nanteuil.
"Messengers of Evil" by Pierre Souvestre
The banker was attracted to her and being a business man he did things quickly.
"The Third Degree" by Charles Klein and Arthur Hornblow
What a sentence for a rich Parisian banker!
"Le Morvan, [A District of France,] Its Wild Sports, Vineyards and Forests; with Legends, Antiquities, Rural and Local Sketches" by Henri de Crignelle
The banker's manner and implied insinuation wounded young Randolph's pride, and his cheeks became crimson.
"The Boy Broker" by Frank A. Munsey
Still intent on the sinews of war, he sallied out after breakfast, and approached Erbstein the Banker.
"Ghetto Comedies" by Israel Zangwill
The banker, though he knew something of the man's history, found himself wondering at his youthfulness.
"Louisiana Lou" by William West Winter
This the London banker does, charging the cost of the metal, and all shipping charges, to the account of the New York banker.
"Elements of Foreign Exchange" by Franklin Escher
They have defied the power of the bankers.
"The Martian Cabal" by Roman Frederick Starzl
It is at my banker's just now.
"Masterpieces of Mystery" by Various
Thus for the banker the usual routine began.
"The Eye of Dread" by Payne Erskine
Martinez had once had a slight difference with the banker, and now outrageously Sorenson had recalled it.
"In the Shadow of the Hills" by George C. Shedd
I wonder if you, as a banker, would mind advising me.
"A Captain in the Ranks" by George Cary Eggleston
The Banker took pains to tell Eric, early in their acquaintance, that he was a Jew.
"Villa Eden:" by Berthold Auerbach
It was the roulette banker, he of the spade-cut beard and the superior clothes.
"Where the Pavement Ends" by John Russell
***

In poetry:

One year ago I wished that I
A banker great might be
With a hundred million dollars
And financial majesty;
"Would You Believe It?" by Ellis Parker Butler
A solid Wall Street banker
With securities in sacks
And with clever men to show me
How to pay no income tax;
"Would You Believe It?" by Ellis Parker Butler
A wealthy Wall Street banker
Who raked in cash like hay;
I wished that just a year ago—
And I wish the same today.
"Would You Believe It?" by Ellis Parker Butler
‘We are 'ere met together
in this momentous hower,
Ter lick th' bankers' dirty boots
an' keep the Bank in power.’
"Song Of The Six Hundred M.P.'S" by Ezra Pound
A mighty Wall Street banker
With a whopping lot of power
And an income of somewhere around
A thousand plunks per hour;
"Would You Believe It?" by Ellis Parker Butler
Valliant and Brutus, Vane, Kossuth,
Find here a fitting tryst;
That Yarra-banker far ahead
Is keeping step with Christ.
"May Day" by Bernard O Dowd

In news:

We are sending this letter on behalf of the Independent Community Bankers of America (ICBA)1 and our community bank members.
Universality has had its day and private savings need boost, writes Kirk Hope, chief executive of the New Zealand Bankers Association.
Some forty phone bankers are pitching some major woo.
Cirque du Soleil returns to Bankers Life Fieldhouse with " Quidam, " June 27 to July 1.
Don't hate investment bankers for raking in millions.
For some, it's bankers and bureaucrats.
On bankers and LIBOR, Libya, rationality, charter schools, world leaders, James Bond.
Nicholas Nelson is Don Inigo Gomez, a banker.
Naturally, it's a bunch of burly American I-bankers who made the biggest single-asset deal in European history.
A butterfly flapping its wings in a rain forest is nothing compared to a central banker flapping his lips.
Bankers Abandoned Obama — But the Rest of the Rich Held Surprisingly Strong.
Applaud The Economist for a good dose of common sense, reminding bankers just how foolish they were and how close they brought all the rest of us to the "abyss," as President Obama called it today.
The head of Vienna's Jewish community is criticizing Austria's rightist leader for posting a cartoon showing a banker with a large hooked nose and Star of David cufflinks profiting from Europe's financial crisis.
A Banker Wades Into New Markets by Floating Loans From a Boat.
If you're a West Banker of a certain age, you know about Da Wabbit.
***

In science:

ANSI X9.30 (PART 2), “American National Standard for Financial Services – Public key Cryptology using irreversible algorithms for the financial services industry – part 2: The Secure Hash Algorithm (SHA)”, ASC X9 Secretariat –American Banker’s Association 1993.
CompChall: Addressing Password Guessing Attacks
Should Charlie make a sufficient deposit at his local branch, Banker Bob at headquarters wil l re-activate the account.
Causality, Knowledge and Coordination in Distributed Systems
Should Charlie make a sufficient deposit at his local branch, Banker Bob at headquarters wil l re-activate the account.
Causality, Knowledge and Coordination in Distributed Systems
The owner of the box, who is the banker of the game, does not tel l us the exact numbers of W, B and Y .
G-Brownian Motion and Dynamic Risk Measure under Volatility Uncertainty
Example 3.1.4 A more general situation is that the banker of a game can choose among a set of distribution {F (θ, A)}A∈B(R),θ∈Θ of a random variable ξ .
G-Brownian Motion and Dynamic Risk Measure under Volatility Uncertainty
Public data remain insufficient and private data (British Bankers’ Association (BBA) and Fitch are the main suppliers of data on this market) are based on questionnaires and should be treated with caution.
Credit derivatives: instruments of hedging and factors of instability. The example of ?Credit Default Swaps? on French reference entities
BBA (British Bankers’ Association) LIBOR is the most widely used benchmark or reference rate.
On pricing of interest rate derivatives
***