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Subinfeudation

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Subinfeudation (Law) The granting of lands by inferior lords to their dependents, to be held by themselves by feudal tenure. "The widow is immediate tenant to the heir, by a kind of subinfeudation, or undertenancy."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n subinfeudation The process, in feudal tenure, where the stipendiary or feudatory, considering himself as substantially the owner, began to imitate the example of his sovereign by carving out portions of the benefice or feud, to be held of himself by some other person, on terms and conditions similar to those of the original grant: a continued chain of successive dependencies was thus established, connecting each stipendiary, or vassal as he was termed, with his immediate superior or lord. See Statute of Quia Emptores, under statute.
    • n subinfeudation The fief or tenancy thus established.
    • n subinfeudation Also subfeudation.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Subinfeudation sub-in-fū-dā′shun the right enjoyed by the inferior lord, in imitation of his superiors, of making similar grants of portions of his land to others, to be held by them as his vassals
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Usage

In literature:

The above-named statute forbade the future subinfeudation of lands, and consequently hindered the further creation of manors.
"Notes and Queries, Number 231, April 1, 1854" by Various
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