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Stone canal

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Stone canal (Zoöl) Same as Sand canal, under Sand.
    • ***

Usage

In literature:

On the left, or south-west side, is a mound of earth fenced with stones which is the commencement of the bank of the canal.
"Wild Wales Its People, Language and Scenery" by George Borrow
This first batch of locks in the canal extends over some distance past the fall, and they are partly blasted out of the rock, or built of stone.
"Visit to Iceland and the Scandinavian North" by Ida Pfeiffer
The water is collected into two vast reservoirs, and a canal built and lined with hewn stone.
"Travels Through France and Italy" by Tobias Smollett
Besides, the Abyssinians cruising at the mouth of the canal had made it impassable by a sunken vessel laden with stones.
"Freeland" by Theodor Hertzka
The "Stone Yard" is close by the Preston and Lancaster Canal.
"Home-Life of the Lancashire Factory Folk during the Cotton Famine" by Edwin Waugh
Oh, I kicked a paving-stone into the canal.
"Snarleyyow" by Captain Frederick Marryat
He came at last to one of his old haunts, a small stone house on the edge of the Canal.
"The Tin Soldier" by Temple Bailey
The grand Ship Canal, with its stone banks of about eighty feet width and three locks, transports the largest tonnage around these rapids.
"Continental Monthly, Volume 5, Issue 4" by Various
I even selected the best places to escape up the rough stone walls of the canal.
"Confessions of Boyhood" by John Albee
This canal was crossed by a short solid stone bridge, bearing a quaint enough bridge-house, still used as a dwelling-place.
"A Houseful of Girls" by Sarah Tytler
They stopped where a wooden bridge spanned the narrow canal, for all bridges in Venice were not yet built of stone in the year 1670.
"Stradella" by F(rancis) Marion Crawford
It contains numerous canals, with stone or brick quays; and perhaps it will remind you of Paris along the Seine.
"Four Young Explorers" by Oliver Optic
Planks, stones, enormous blocks of marble, and debris of every kind obstructed the Canal of the Prisons.
"The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. VIII (of X) - Continental Europe II." by Various
This was a large edifice, well built of stone, and connected with canals and earth-works.
"Ancient America, in Notes on American Archaeology" by John D. Baldwin
The town is divided by long, wide canals into many islands, which are united by drawbridges, turning bridges, and stone bridges.
"Holland, v. 1 (of 2)" by Edmondo de Amicis
The waterway is more like a canal with banks built up with stone blocks.
""And they thought we wouldn't fight"" by Floyd Gibbons
At this place the Erie canal is carried over the Genessee river by a stone aqueduct bridge.
"Alida" by Amelia Stratton Comfield
The canal, shut by the gates, is crossed by a stone bridge, on which some people are walking.
"The Standard Galleries - Holland" by Esther Singleton
The Grand Canal is a genealogy of Venice, illustrated and engraved on stone.
"The Mediterranean" by T. G. (Thomas Gray) Bonney, E. A. R. Ball, H. D. Traill, Grant Allen, and Arthur Griffiths
These gates were in big stone arches, through which the water passed to the canal when the lake was used as a feeder.
"History of the Johnstown Flood" by Willis Fletcher Johnson
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In news:

They've taken snapshots of each other standing arm in arm on brick and stone arched bridges spanning narrow canals that unwind behind them like ribbons.
The Flight of Five is a stone version of the original wooden stairstep locks constructed when the canal opened in 1825.
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