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Augustinian Canons

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Augustinian Canons an Augustinian monastic order
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Augustinian canons an order of monks once popular in England and Ireland; -- called also regular canons of St. Austin, and black canons.
    • Augustinian canons See under Augustinian.
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Usage

In literature:

BOLTON ABBEY, an old abbey in Yorkshire, 6 m. E. of Skipton; was founded by the Augustinian canons.
"The Nuttall Encyclopaedia" by Edited by Rev. James Wood
Returning, to England in 1186 he became an Augustinian Canon, and in 1213 Abbot of Cirencester.
"A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature" by John W. Cousin
Augustinian Canons, reformed, 81; house at Oxford, 117.
"The Age of Erasmus" by P. S. Allen
A Priory of Augustinian Canons, dedicated to St. Mary, was founded here by Richard Argenton, in the reign of Henry III.
"Hertfordshire" by Herbert W Tompkins
A foundation for Augustinian canons followed on the site early in the 12th century.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3" by Various
This house of Augustinian canons was founded in 1121 by Walter Espec and his wife Adeline.
"St. Bernard of Clairvaux's Life of St. Malachy of Armagh" by H. J. Lawlor
He had been previously an Augustinian Canon of Bodmin, in Cornwall.
"Notes and Queries, Number 228, March 11, 1854" by Various
Most of the congregations of Augustinian canons had convents of nuns, called canonesses; many such exist to this day.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 8" by Various
After spending a year in retirement with the Augustinian canons of Merton (Surrey) he became a theological lecturer in Oxford.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 10" by Various
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