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Ambrose Bierce

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Ambrose Bierce United States writer of caustic wit (1842-1914)
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Usage

In literature:

Or, as Roger Mifflin remarked during a passing enthusiasm for Ambrose Bierce, the true noctes ambrosianae are the noctes ambrose bierceianae.
"The Haunted Bookshop" by Christopher Morley
But California can tell us stories that are grim children of the tales of the wild Ambrose Bierce.
"The Art Of The Moving Picture" by Vachel Lindsay
These guys were good, but no matter how good they were, Catherine Lewis had vanished as neatly as Ambrose Bierce.
"Highways in Hiding" by George Oliver Smith
No formal course in fiction-writing can equal a close and observant perusal of the stories of Edgar Allan Poe or Ambrose Bierce.
"Writings in the United Amateur, 1915-1922" by Howard Phillips Lovecraft
I was reading Ambrose Bierce when she came in.
"The Huddlers" by William Campbell Gault
That one is Ambrose Bierce.
"Literature in the Making" by Various
Bierce, Ambrose, 51, 304.
"The Life of Bret Harte" by Henry Childs Merwin
No further word has ever come from or of Ambrose Bierce.
"The Letters of Ambrose Bierce" by Ambrose Bierce
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In news:

E verything changed for Ambrose Bierce the day he was shot in the head.
We feel a kinship with one of our own, a giant in American words — Ambrose Bierce .
Ambrose Bierce and America's First Great War Stories.
An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge is a short story by Ambrose Bierce.
The leading figure in a small group of men of whom — and of whom only — it is positively known that immense numbers of their countrymen did not want any of them for president.— Ambrose Bierce, "The Devil's Dictionary" (1906).
We feel a kinship with one of our own, a giant in American words — Ambrose Bierce.
Ambrose Bierce, "The Devil's Dictionary" (1906).
That wickedly satirical Ambrose Bierce described politics as "the conduct of public affairs for private advantage.".
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