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vesture

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v vesture provide or cover with a cloak
    • n vesture a covering designed to be worn on a person's body
    • n vesture something that covers or cloaks like a garment "fields in a vesture of green"
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Vesture A garment or garments; a robe; clothing; dress; apparel; vestment; covering; envelope. "Approach, and kiss her sacred vesture's hem.""Rocks, precipices, and gulfs, appareled with a vesture of plants.""There polished chests embroidered vestures graced."
    • Vesture (O. Eng. Law) Seizin; possession.
    • Vesture (O. Eng. Law) The corn, grass, underwood, stubble, etc., with which land was covered; as, the vesture of an acre.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n vesture Garments in general; especially, the dress or costume worn at one time by any person.
    • n vesture That which invests or covers; covering generally; envelop; integument.
    • n vesture In old law: All, except trees, that grows on or forms the covering of land: as, the vesture of an acre.
    • n vesture Investiture; seizin; possession. Synonyms and See raiment.
    • vesture To put vesture or clothing on; clothe; robe; vest.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Vesture ves′tūr clothing: dress: a robe: integument
    • v.t Vesture to clothe, robe
    • ***

Quotations

  • James Baldwin
    James%20Baldwin
    “The making of an American begins at the point where he himself rejects all other ties, any other history, and himself adopts the vesture of his adopted land.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OF. vesture, vesteure, F. vêture, LL. vestitura, from L. vestire, to clothe, dress. See Vest (v. t.), and cf. Vestiture

Usage

In literature:

Kind souls, what, weep you, when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded?
"Shakspere, Personal Recollections" by John A. Joyce
And knowest thou no Prophet, even in the vesture, environment, and dialect of this age?
"Sartor Resartus, and On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic in History" by Thomas Carlyle
Our heroes nervously obeyed the order, and confided their outer vesture to Aspinall's custody.
"Follow My leader" by Talbot Baines Reed
It was love which made Him assume the vesture of human flesh.
"Expositions of Holy Scripture" by Alexander Maclaren
He was magnificently dressed in some vesture that had the luster of a polished plate of gold, and the suppleness of velvet.
"Edison's Conquest of Mars" by Garrett Putnam Serviss
With the white vestures, all attending thee.
"The Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2" by Robert Herrick
But while this muddy vesture of decay Doth grossly close us in, we cannot hear it.
"Myths and Marvels of Astronomy" by Richard A. Proctor
And He was clothed in a vesture dipped with blood; and His name is called the Word of God.
"The Work Of Christ" by A. C. Gaebelein
The "muddy vesture of decay" which "grossly closes in" our diviner principle has been burnt up and absorbed.
"Suspended Judgments" by John Cowper Powys
He has spent every energy of his life here, in building the vesture.
"Child and Country" by Will Levington Comfort
Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded?
"The New Hudson Shakespeare: Julius Caesar" by William Shakespeare
At the moment of the Revolution everyone, according to his aspirations, dressed the new belief in a different rational vesture.
"Introduction to the Science of Sociology" by Robert E. Park
To one side of it the farms lay, brown and gold in their autumn vesture.
"Louisiana Lou" by William West Winter
Face and vesture alike revealed to the sharp eye of the Italian the woe underneath.
"Dr. Sevier" by George W. Cable
They can enter the court of the Gentiles; but their mortal vesture is too muddy for admission into the holy of holies.
"Hours in a Library" by Leslie Stephen
She descended the rest of the way and advanced, revealed in her complete height and all her radiant vesture.
"The Cup of Fury" by Rupert Hughes
Did he, perchance in dreams, catch something of "the rustling of her vesture" that influenced his mind to the change?
"The Brownings" by Lilian Whiting
She made a vesture thereof over all which is in him, so that he might give to him who asked him.
"The Gnôsis of the Light" by F. Lamplugh
Such a right is known as a right of sole vesture.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 7" by Various
His vesture was a robe of blood, and they Who followed him proclaimed, The Word of God!
"The Poetical Works of William Lisle Bowles Vol. 2" by William Lisle Bowles
***

In poetry:

We see no halo round his brow
Till love its own recalls,
And, like a leaf that quits the bough,
The mortal vesture falls.
"A Memorial tribute" by Oliver Wendell Holmes
See a maiden, a fair maiden,
Vestured in a garb of yore,
Singing yonder while her lover
Pleads with longing eyes for more!
"The Old Piano" by Roden Berkeley Wriothesley Noel
Heaven-lent, for Heaven they held their dream,
Though their vesture, e'en purple, marked it not:
The earthlings one in fortune seem,
But are forgone -- no gold, no gleam!
"Introit : VI. The Great" by Thomas MacDonagh
Yet must I live, lest her spirit should say,
Meeting mine in its flight from this vesture of clay,
“Where are our little ones? Where do they stay?
And why did you leave them?”
"A Lament" by Charles Harpur
All old grey histories hiding thy clear features,
O secret spirit and sovereign, all men's tales,
Creeds woven of men thy children and thy creatures,
They have woven for vestures of thee and for veils.
"Mater Triumphalis" by Algernon Charles Swinburne
Come, Anna! come, the morning dawns,
Faint streaks of radiance tinge the skies;
Come, let us seek the dewy lawns,
And watch the early lark arise;
While nature, clad in vesture gay,
Hails the loved return of day.
"A Pastoral Song" by Henry Kirke White