Another posts

cankerous definition choi gai draw on definition blackout party definition cushion capital allusory definition rit large due east definition well respected definition definition of sculpture in the round gagged and bound meaning continency definition torching definition ralph lauren jodhpur boots tew definition corbelling definition catch away nebulous star brace oneself vly definition arclight definition how to spell stopped delphic oracle definition annapurna definition elephant beds explorable definition tribune chronicle garage sales right flank march alveolitis definition hold one's own halfling definition

take

Definitions

  • TAKING LUNCH NEAR THE RIVER
    TAKING LUNCH NEAR THE RIVER
  • WordNet 3.6
    • v take be stricken by an illness, fall victim to an illness "He got AIDS","She came down with pneumonia","She took a chill"
    • v take remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract "remove a threat","remove a wrapper","Remove the dirty dishes from the table","take the gun from your pocket","This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
    • v take ascertain or determine by measuring, computing or take a reading from a dial "take a pulse","A reading was taken of the earth's tremors"
    • v take take on a certain form, attribute, or aspect "His voice took on a sad tone","The story took a new turn","he adopted an air of superiority","She assumed strange manners","The gods assume human or animal form in these fables"
    • v take be seized or affected in a specified way "take sick","be taken drunk"
    • v take be a student of a certain subject "She is reading for the bar exam"
    • v take interpret something in a certain way; convey a particular meaning or impression "I read this address as a satire","How should I take this message?","You can't take credit for this!"
    • v take accept or undergo, often unwillingly "We took a pay cut"
    • v take pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives "Take any one of these cards","Choose a good husband for your daughter","She selected a pair of shoes from among the dozen the salesgirl had shown her"
    • v take take into consideration for exemplifying purposes "Take the case of China","Consider the following case"
    • v take take as an undesirable consequence of some event or state of affairs "the accident claimed three lives","The hard work took its toll on her"
    • v take lay claim to; as of an idea "She took credit for the whole idea"
    • v take make a film or photograph of something "take a scene","shoot a movie"
    • v take obtain by winning "Winner takes all","He took first prize"
    • v take point or cause to go (blows, weapons, or objects such as photographic equipment) towards "Please don't aim at your little brother!","He trained his gun on the burglar","Don't train your camera on the women","Take a swipe at one's opponent"
    • v take serve oneself to, or consume regularly "Have another bowl of chicken soup!","I don't take sugar in my coffee"
    • v take get into one's hands, take physically "Take a cookie!","Can you take this bag, please"
    • v take have sex with; archaic use "He had taken this woman when she was most vulnerable"
    • v take travel or go by means of a certain kind of transportation, or a certain route "He takes the bus to work","She takes Route 1 to Newark"
    • v take proceed along in a vehicle "We drive the turnpike to work"
    • v take occupy or take on "He assumes the lotus position","She took her seat on the stage","We took our seats in the orchestra","She took up her position behind the tree","strike a pose"
    • v take take somebody somewhere "We lead him to our chief","can you take me to the main entrance?","He conducted us to the palace"
    • v take head into a specified direction "The escaped convict took to the hills","We made for the mountains"
    • v take take something or somebody with oneself somewhere "Bring me the box from the other room","Take these letters to the boss","This brings me to the main point"
    • v take experience or feel or submit to "Take a test","Take the plunge"
    • v take to get into a position of having, e.g., safety, comfort "take shelter from the storm"
    • v take take into one's possession "We are taking an orphan from Romania","I'll take three salmon steaks"
    • v take take by force "Hitler took the Baltic Republics","The army took the fort on the hill"
    • v take buy, select "I'll take a pound of that sausage"
    • v take engage for service under a term of contract "We took an apartment on a quiet street","Let's rent a car","Shall we take a guide in Rome?"
    • v take receive or obtain regularly "We take the Times every day"
    • v take make use of or accept for some purpose "take a risk","take an opportunity"
    • v take receive willingly something given or offered "The only girl who would have him was the miller's daughter","I won't have this dog in my house!","Please accept my present"
    • v take admit into a group or community "accept students for graduate study","We'll have to vote on whether or not to admit a new member"
    • v take require (time or space) "It took three hours to get to work this morning","This event occupied a very short time"
    • v take assume, as of positions or roles "She took the job as director of development","he occupies the position of manager","the young prince will soon occupy the throne"
    • v take develop a habit "He took to visiting bars"
    • v take carry out "take action","take steps","take vengeance"
    • v take require as useful, just, or proper "It takes nerve to do what she did","success usually requires hard work","This job asks a lot of patience and skill","This position demands a lot of personal sacrifice","This dinner calls for a spectacular dessert","This intervention does not postulate a patient's consent"
    • v take be capable of holding or containing "This box won't take all the items","The flask holds one gallon"
    • v take have with oneself; have on one's person "She always takes an umbrella","I always carry money","She packs a gun when she goes into the mountains"
    • v take be designed to hold or take "This surface will not take the dye"
    • n take the act of photographing a scene or part of a scene without interruption
    • n take the income or profit arising from such transactions as the sale of land or other property "the average return was about 5%"
    • ***

Additional illustrations & photos:

"'I will take care of Boh.'" "'I will take care of Boh.'"
Daisy takes the necklace out of the box Daisy takes the necklace out of the box
Uncle John takes Nellie and Rose to see the well Uncle John takes Nellie and Rose to see the well
JACK TAKES THE GIANT'S MONEY-BAGS JACK TAKES THE GIANT'S MONEY-BAGS
JACK TAKES THE TALKING HARP JACK TAKES THE TALKING HARP
Taking the Top Rail 113 Taking the Top Rail 113
Si Takes a Crack at A Reb 147 Si Takes a Crack at A Reb 147
The Three Bears take a walk The Three Bears take a walk

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Women take three times longer than men when using the toilet
    • Take In a somewhat passive sense, to receive; to bear; to endure; to acknowledge; to accept.
    • Take In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands, or otherwise; to grasp; to get into one's hold or possession; to procure; to seize and carry away; to convey.
    • Take Not to refuse or balk at; to undertake readily; to clear; as, to take a hedge or fence.
    • p. p Take tāk Taken.
    • Take That which is taken, such as the quantity of fish captured at one haul or catch, or the amouont of money collected during one event; as, the box-office take .
    • Take (Print) The quantity or copy given to a compositor at one time.
    • Take To accept the word or offer of; to receive and accept; to bear; to submit to; to enter into agreement with; -- used in general senses; as, to take a form or shape.
    • Take To accept, as something offered; to receive; not to refuse or reject; to admit.
    • Take To admit of being pictured, as in a photograph; as, his face does not take well.
    • Take To admit, as, something presented to the mind; not to dispute; to allow; to accept; to receive in thought; to entertain in opinion; to understand; to interpret; to regard or look upon; to consider; to suppose; as, to take a thing for granted; this I take to be man's motive; to take men for spies.
    • Take To assume; to adopt; to acquire, as shape; to permit to one's self; to indulge or engage in; to yield to; to have or feel; to enjoy or experience, as rest, revenge, delight, shame; to form and adopt, as a resolution; -- used in general senses, limited by a following complement, in many idiomatic phrases; as, to take a resolution; I take the liberty to say.
    • Take To bear without ill humor or resentment; to submit to; to tolerate; to endure; as, to take a joke; he will take an affront from no man.
    • Take To carry; to convey; to deliver to another; to hand over; as, he took the book to the bindery; he took a dictionary with him.
    • Take To draw; to deduce; to derive.
    • Take To employ; to use; to occupy; hence, to demand; to require; as, it takes so much cloth to make a coat; it takes five hours to get to Boston from New York by car.
    • Take To form a likeness of; to copy; to delineate; to picture; as, to take a picture of a person.
    • Take To gain or secure the interest or affection of; to captivate; to engage; to interest; to charm.
    • Take To give or deliver (a blow to); to strike; hit; as, he took me in the face; he took me a blow on the head.
    • Take To lead; to conduct; as, to take a child to church.
    • Take To make a picture, photograph, or the like, of; as, to take a group or a scene.
    • Take To make selection of; to choose; also, to turn to; to have recourse to; as, to take the road to the right.
    • Take To move or direct the course; to resort; to betake one's self; to proceed; to go; -- usually with to; as, the fox, being hard pressed, took to the hedge.
    • Take To obtain possession of by force or artifice; to get the custody or control of; to reduce into subjection to one's power or will; to capture; to seize; to make prisoner; as, to take an army, a city, or a ship; also, to come upon or befall; to fasten on; to attack; to seize; -- said of a disease, misfortune, or the like.
    • Take To please; to gain reception; to succeed. "Each wit may praise it for his own dear sake,
      And hint he writ it, if the thing should take ."
    • Take To receive as something to be eaten or drunk; to partake of; to swallow; as, to take food or wine.
    • Take To remove; to withdraw; to deduct; -- with from; as, to take the breath from one; to take two from four.
    • Take To take hold; to fix upon anything; to have the natural or intended effect; to accomplish a purpose; as, he was inoculated, but the virus did not take . "When flame taketh and openeth, it giveth a noise.""In impressions from mind to mind, the impression taketh, but is overcome . . . before it work any manifest effect."
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: ABBA got their name by taking the first letter from each of their names (Agnetha, Bjorn, Benny, Anni-frid.)
    • v.t Take tāk to lay hold of: to get into one's possession: to catch: to capture: to captivate: to receive: to choose: to use: to allow: to understand: to agree to: to become affected with
    • v.i Take to catch: to have the intended effect: to gain reception, to please: to move or direct the course of: to have recourse to:—pa.t. took; pa.p. tā′ken
    • n Take quantity of fish taken or captured at one time
    • adj Take captivating: alluring
    • ***

Quotations

  • Lord Chesterfield
    Lord%20Chesterfield
    “Be your character what it will, it will be known; and nobody will take it upon your word.”
  • E.E. (Edward. E.) Cummings
    E.E.%20%28Edward.%20E.%29%20Cummings
    “It takes three to make a child.”
  • Lord Chesterfield
    Lord%20Chesterfield
    “Take the tone of the company you are in.”
  • George Eliot
    George%20Eliot
    “It's them as take advantage that get advantage in this world.”
  • Barry Goldwater
    Barry Goldwater
    “A government that is big enough to give you all you want is big enough to take it all away.”
  • Publilius Syrus
    Publilius%20Syrus
    “Take care that no one hates you justly.”

Idioms

Black will take no other hue - Evil can take many disguises but it is always black (evil).
***
Don't take any wooden nickels - (USA) This idiom is used to advise people not to be cheated or ripped off.
***
Double take - If someone does a double take, they react very slowly to something to show how shocked or surprised they are.
***
Give and take - Where there is give and take, people make concessions in order to get things they want in negotiations.
***
It takes a village to raise a child - It takes many people to teach a child all that he or she should know.
***
It takes two to tango - This idiom is used to suggest that when things go wrong, both sides are involved and neither side is completely innocent.
***
Let the devil take the hindmost - This idiom means that you should think of yourself and not be concerned about other people; look after yourself and let the devil take the hindmost.
***
On the take - (UK) Someone who is stealing from work is on the take.
***
Take a back seat - If you take a back seat to something or someone, you are surbordinate.
***
Take a hike - This is a way of telling someone to get out.
***
Take a leaf out of someone's book - If you take a leaf out of someone's book, you copy something they do because it will help you.
***
Take a nosedive - When things take a nosedive, they decline very quickly and head towards disaster.
***
Take a punch - If somebody takes a blow, something bad happens to them.
***
Take a raincheck - If you take a rain check, you decline an offer now, suggesting you will accept it later. ('Raincheck' is also used.)
***
Take a shine to - If you take a shine to something or someone, you like it or them instantly.
***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Icel. taka,; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. tēkan, to touch; of uncertain origin

Usage

In literature:

And now he was taking to himself another girl!
"Ralph the Heir" by Anthony Trollope
With infinite humour he declared his intention of taking them home to his children.
"Desert Conquest" by A. M. Chisholm
I can't take him like this.
"The Creators" by May Sinclair
His purpose was fixed to take the children with him.
"Hopes and Fears scenes from the life of a spinster" by Charlotte M. Yonge
It's a g-game of give an' take, an' at that a h-heap more give than take.
"The Fighting Edge" by William MacLeod Raine
A gift I shouldn't think your father would like to take, or have us take, which comes to the same thing.
"The End of a Coil" by Susan Warner
Why, I'm going to make the shark take the poison instead of taking it myself.
"Hunting the Skipper" by George Manville Fenn
That would take him to anywhere and back before the Bank closed.
"Somehow Good" by William de Morgan
You must come here and take my place, and take care of those I leave behind; will you?
"The Wide, Wide World" by Susan Warner
If you take me back, he will take me back.
"The Saracen: Land of the Infidel" by Robert Shea
The election of a new pope would take months; it had been known to take years.
"The Saracen: The Holy War" by Robert Shea
Take this and rest a little, and then I will take you home.
"The Marriage of Elinor" by Margaret Oliphant
Here he was, fifty-two years of age, clean, honorable, highly distinguished, as the world takes it, but single.
"Jennie Gerhardt" by Theodore Dreiser
Lay it in a dish, take off the skin carefully, take out the bones, and peel the tongue.
"The Cook and Housekeeper's Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches," by Mary Eaton
He can't take up things where he left them, but he's got to take them up somewhere.
"The Prisoner" by Alice Brown
You would take her for a beggar and might offer her a penny, and she'd take it.
"Ireland as It Is" by Robert John Buckley (AKA R.J.B.)
He was only determined to have some fresh meat to take back to camp.
"Si Klegg, Book 5 (of 6) The Deacon's Adventures At Chattanooga In Caring For The Boys" by John McElroy
I have to take an interest in them because they take an interest in me.
"The "Genius"" by Theodore Dreiser
I take it that the generals of a beaten army talk very little over their late defeat.
"The Bramleighs Of Bishop's Folly" by Charles James Lever
L.J., 115, Trust God, and He will Take Care of You.
"The Bible Story" by Rev. Newton Marshall Hall
***

In poetry:

Take tremors in Thy arms,
And with contriv-ed charms
Allure
A love unsure.
"Any Saint" by Francis Thompson
Ottima
Do you
Fondle me then! Who means to take your life
For that, my Sebald?
"Pippa Passes: Part I: Morning" by Robert Browning
I asked for Thee—
And Thou didst come
To take me home
Within Thy Heart to be.
"Requests" by Digby Mackworth Dolben
like a golden
flower
I wouldn't
take all Croesus'
kingdom with love
thrown in, for her
"Cleis" by Sappho
Feed apace then, greedy eyes,
On the wonder you behold;
Take it sudden as it flies,
Though you take it not to hold.
When your eyes have done their part,
Thought must length it in the heart.
"Are They Shadows" by Samuel Daniel
If thou, the Almighty wilt take to thy share,
Good fortune will follow, where-e'er thou shalt lead,
And Christ and his saints will take thee to their care,
The skies will receive thee, and Demons will dread.
"We Must Cleave To Christ, Without Suffering Any Thing To Turn Us Away From Him" by Rees Prichard

In news:

Either Take a Shot Or Take a Chance .
Gingrich should take a bow, then he should take a powder .
What we take for granted, others take for vacation.
Thomas the Train Lovers, take precautions and also take heart .
Tom Morello at Occupy Wall Street: ' Take It Easy, but Take It'.
In Desperate Times, the Rise to Take the Reins and Take On Fear Itself.
Gary Knight Takes a Beating on Takings .
This guy, however, takes dodge ball very seriously and pulls off an amazing ninja-like flip-toss to take someone out.
New rule: Take time to take in the tweets.
"What would it take to get you to take part in a Neighborhood Watch program in your community.".
If you are taking your notebook on the road and expect to take advantage of a hot spot or two along the way, your personal files could be at risk.
Good morning and welcome to Summit Up, the world's only daily column that will take as long to read as it takes your coffee to cool down this morning.
After Andre takes Tim's snow cone machine to the new restaurant, Tim heads to the Upper Crust to take back what's his.
To take or not to take.
The trade fair for water and wastewater, which takes placeApril 23-26, 2013, has developed a concept that takes the changing situation in the water industry into account.
***

In science:

The minimum value that Lmax /Lj can take as j runs from 1 to N is unity; similarly, the maximum value that Lmin /Lj can take is unity.
Monte Carlo: Basics
When α < 1, the variable y has no mean, and it turns out that we can take bk ≡ 0; for α = 1, we can take bn = c log n, where c is some constant depending on F.
Mathematics of learning
Proof: Take A as in Corollary 7.1, and take a non-zero finite pro jection q in A.
A simple C*-algebra with a finite and an infinite projection
More generally, take p = αq where α ∈ (0, ∞) is constant, and take the limit as q ↓ 0.
The Random-Cluster Model
This formula takes on an especially simple form when q = 2, since non-zero mod-2 flows necessarily take only the value 1.
The Random-Cluster Model
Taking basic forms is then equivalent to ˜g invariance, roughly corresponding to the motivation of taking C∗ (G) invariants given at the beginning of this section.
Quantum Field Theory and Representation Theory: A Sketch
Note that the limit ǫ → we would like to take is the same as that of taking the coupling constant to zero in the continuum limit as specified by the asymptotic freedom of the theory.
Quantum Field Theory and Representation Theory: A Sketch
The algebra A is obtained from B ⊗ B by taking a quotient by the additional relation {X, Y } = 0 and then taking invariants.
On the Cachazo-Douglas-Seiberg-Witten conjecture for simple Lie algebras
The lemma is now proved by taking δ = min(δ1, δ2 ) and taking bj to be the restriction of aj, regarded as a section over S 1 of the continuous field of Theorem 6.1, to I = exp(2πi(−δ, δ)).
Crossed products by finite cyclic group actions with the tracial Rokhlin property
If we take the product of these k inequalities and then take kth roots, we have (A.22).
An almost sure invariance principle for the range of planar random walks
We take the length of the chain N (later we will take the limit N → ∞) to be a multiple of n.
Absence of jump discontinuity in the magnetization in quasi-one-dimensional random-field Ising models
Suppose that: (i) either the coordinate changes take their values in N or(H ), the normalizer of H in G, this condition is satisfied for symplectic bund les whose coordinate changes take their values in the connected component S ymp(F, ω )0 of the group of symplectic automorphisms S ymp(F, ω ).
Gerbes, 2-gerbes and symplectic fibrations
As an immediate consequence of Lemma 11.11, we can describe, for example, the typed degree sequence of G2, taking fi,d(v, G) to be the 1-neighbourhood function taking the value 1 when v has degree d and type i, and 0 otherwise.
The phase transition in inhomogeneous random graphs
The general case when X and Y could be take a countable or uncountable number of values then follows, either by a discretization argument, or by replacing the sums with integrals and using Fubini’s theorem; we omit the details, since for our application we only need the case when X, Y take finitely many values.
Random symmetric matrices are almost surely non-singular
Now, we take a w such that lk ≤ |D(w)| ≤ lk2 and take V1 = D(w), then V1 is clearly connected .
Colouring complete bipartite graphs from random lists
***