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symphysis

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n symphysis a growing together of parts or structures
    • n symphysis an abnormal adhesion of two or more structures
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Symphysis (Anat) An articulation formed by intervening cartilage; as, the pubic symphysis .
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n symphysis In anatomy and zoology: The union or connection of bones in the middle line of the body, either by confluence, by direct apposition, or by the intervention of cartilage or ligament; also, the part, or configuration of parts, resulting from such union or connection. Symphysis usually constitutes an immovable joint, and may be so intimate that all trace of original separateness of the parts is lost. These two conditions are illustrated in the human body in the symphysis of the pubic bones and of the two halves of the lower jaw respectively; but in many animals symphyses remain freely movable, as in the two halves of the lower jaw of serpents. The term is chiefly restricted to the growing together or close apposition of two halves of a bilaterally symmetrical bone, or of a bone with its fellow of the opposite side—other terms, as ankylosis, synosteosis, synchondrosis, and suture, being applied in other cases. See cuts under innominatum and pelvis.
    • n symphysis Some point or line of union between two parts; a commissure; a chiasm: as, the symphysis of the optic nerves.
    • n symphysis Attachment of one part to another; a growing together; insertion or gomphosis with union: as, the symphysis of teeth with the jaw. See acrodont, pleurodont.
    • n symphysis Coalescence or growing together of parts so as to close a natural passage; atresia.
    • n symphysis In botany, a coalescence or growing together of similar parts.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Symphysis sim′fi-sis the union of two parts of the skeleton, either by confluence, by direct apposition, or by the intervention of cartilage or ligament: the union of parts normally separate, coalescence or growing together of parts
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
NL., fr. Gr., fr. to make to grow together; sy`n with + to cause to grow; to grow
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. syn, with, phyein, to grow.

Usage

In literature:

Symphysiotomy is an operation consisting of division of the pubic symphysis in order to facilitate delivery in narrow pelves.
"Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine" by George M. Gould
Symphysis: where two sclerites are joined together by a soft membrane, permitting a slight motion.
"Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology" by John. B. Smith
W. The symphysis pubis.
"Surgical Anatomy" by Joseph Maclise
In some runts the symphysis of the lower jaw is remarkably solid.
"The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol. I." by Charles Darwin
Lower jaw exceedingly long and narrow, the symphysis being more than half the length.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 5, Slice 7" by Various
The symphysis, which completely blends the rami of the jaw, is short.
"Dragons of the Air" by H. G. Seeley
Symphysis, a connection of bones without a movable joint.
"A Manual of the Antiquity of Man" by J. P. MacLean
The ligamentous cartilage at the symphysis pubis is broader and shorter.
"Beauty" by Alexander Walker
In the human skeleton, the pubis of one side is united to that of the opposite side, to form the pubic symphysis.
"Artistic Anatomy of Animals" by Édouard Cuyer
The zygomatic arch is strong and broad: the mandibles are provided with a long symphysis.
"The Cambridge Natural History, Vol X., Mammalia" by Frank Evers Beddard
The first group is characterized by the full development of this union, both pubis and ischium entering into the symphysis.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 14, Slice 6" by Various
The symphysis is very wide and deeply excavated, with a broad and slightly prominent inferior ridge narrowing in front.
"Trees. A Woodland Notebook" by Herbert Maxwell
The symphysis is very wide and deeply excavated, with a broad and slightly prominent inferior ridge narrowing in front.
"Extinct Birds" by Walter Rothschild
In the fifth month, the fundus will be felt half way, or a little more, between the symphysis pubis and umbilicus.
"A System of Midwifery" by Edward Rigby
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In news:

Degenerative changes involving the symphysis pubis are a common radiographic finding.
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In science:

This boson–fermion symphysis is a common characteristic of duals to supersymmetric σ–models and was first observed in for the non–Abelian dual of the supersymmetric extension of the Chiral Model on O(4) and for Abelian duality in .
Non--Abelian Duality, Parafermions and Supersymmetry
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