Another posts

murder warrant schumer bloodstock give rise definition oblique planes internal typology weather wise meaning throw down the glove gulf of mexico definition golan heights definition felicitations in a sentence serve its purpose connation definition ophidian unmasked solivagant definition weak hinged trafficker definition lorenzo dressing plaintiveness definition mollyscum contagiosum definition decomposition reaction pot belly banks thick and thin meaning tug on my heartstrings behind the curtain meaning cheap jacks crucis definition exilic definition eccentric pulley least bit a theory fall by the wayside when permeative definition calculative definition equivocate sentence

stultify

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v stultify deprive of strength or efficiency; make useless or worthless "This measure crippled our efforts","Their behavior stultified the boss's hard work"
    • v stultify cause to appear foolish "He stultified himself by contradicting himself and being inconsistent"
    • v stultify prove to be of unsound mind or demonstrate someone's incompetence "nobody is legally allowed to stultify himself"
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Stultify (Law) To allege or prove to be of unsound mind, so that the performance of some act may be avoided.
    • Stultify To make foolish; to make a fool of; as, to stultify one by imposition; to stultify one's self by silly reasoning or conduct.
    • Stultify To regard as a fool, or as foolish. "The modern sciolist stultifies all understanding but his own, and that which he conceives like his own."
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • stultify To make or cause to appear foolish; reduce to foolishness or absurdity: used of persons or things.
    • stultify To look upon as a fool; regard as foolish.
    • stultify In law, to allege one's own insanity.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Stultify stul′ti-fī to make a fool of: to cause to appear foolish: to destroy the force of one's argument by self-contradiction:
    • v.t Stultify stul′ti-fī (law) to allege or prove to be of unsound mind
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. stultus, foolish + -fy,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. stultus, foolish, facĕre, to make.

Usage

In literature:

This error stultifies the logic of divine Science, and must interfere with its practical demonstration.
"Unity of Good" by Mary Baker Eddy
It will stultify every rule of precaution and violate every law of chance.
"Poison Island" by Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch (Q)
He recognized that he must not stultify it by a show of irritation.
"Once Upon A Time" by Richard Harding Davis
One may say that these things tend inevitably toward mechanism and formalism and the stultifying of initiative.
"Craftsmanship in Teaching" by William Chandler Bagley
Since the natures of the two means differ, it does not stultify the water-color that it cannot run the deep gamut of oil.
"Pen Drawing" by Charles Maginnis
To have even one confidant would be to stultify the whole affair.
"The Argosy" by Various
To do so would be to stultify himself.
"Explanation of Catholic Morals" by John H. Stapleton
All over the world socialists are breaking away from the stultifying influence of the outworn determinism.
"A Preface to Politics" by Walter Lippmann
He sat still, stultified and stony, silently gazing at the paper in his hands.
"The Phantom Of Bogue Holauba" by Charles Egbert Craddock (AKA Mary Noailles Murfree)
It was a choice that from the first moment not only defeated but almost stultified the liberal movement.
"The Negro and the Nation" by George S. Merriam
For such is the stultifying effect of a civilized environment.
"The Wreck of the Titan" by Morgan Robertson
Neither of us can be expected to stultify his own.
"Robert Elsmere" by Mrs. Humphry Ward
He felt himself stultified by this truth.
"Hidden Gold" by Wilder Anthony
Yon are fully aware how much of the fault is your own; but you are stultified and hardened to shame.
"Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 55, No. 343, May 1844" by Various
Education on such lines seems curiously false to many minds, as well as stultifying.
"'Murphy'" by Major Gambier-Parry
Why stultify thyself with these unbelieving surmises.
"Memories of Bethany" by John Ross Macduff
My respect for law is weakened, my regard for the rights of others seems stultified.
"The Bachelors" by William Dana Orcutt
To prevent their fulfilment were to stultify their existence.
"The Wave" by Algernon Blackwood
He sat still, stultified and stony, silently gazing at the paper in his hands.
"The Raid of The Guerilla and Other Stories" by Charles Egbert Craddock
In the national region it stultifies its own objects most effectively.
"The New Germany" by George Young
***

In poetry:

Condemning with profound disdain
All other nations' heartless greed,
How couldst thou buy from humbled Spain
A people struggling to attain
A freedom suited to their need?
Why stultify thy boasted creed?
"Fallen" by John Lawson Stoddard

In news:

Freezing cold, stultifying heat, insects, rodents, muck and mire: the romance of winemaking over a barrel.
Terence Davies' film of Terence Rattigan's The Deep Blue Sea, a play dating from '50s England, captures the tensions between the stultified upper class and the lack of illusions of the working class.
For the first time, the saga of the irrepressible Ostap Bender, a trickster and individualist at odds with the stultifying collective atmosphere, is available in English.
The summer of 1988 was stultifyingly hot even by Washington, DC, standards, and the Mississippi River basin was suffering a catastrophic drought.
Stultifying heat and humidity in the midst of summer is no great surprise.
Antiestablishment anger is as crucial an element of rock'n'roll as cars and girls, but where do you turn when the escapism becomes as stultifying and stringent as the world you're seeking to escape.
***

In science:

In fact, to smugly dismiss the work of our predecessors as simply errant science would stultify our own practice.
Book Review: The Genesis of General Relativity
***