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smelt

Definitions

  • Making “trialls” of iron. Evidences of an earth oven or small furnace were discovered at Jamestown during archeological explorations. Small amounts of iron may have been smelted in the furnace during the early years of the settlement. (Conjectural sketch by Sidney E. King.)
    Making “trialls” of iron. Evidences of an earth oven or small furnace were discovered at Jamestown during archeological explorations. Small amounts of iron may have been smelted in the furnace during the early years of the settlement. (Conjectural sketch by Sidney E. King.)
  • WordNet 3.6
    • v smelt extract (metals) by heating
    • n smelt small trout-like silvery marine or freshwater food fishes of cold northern waters
    • n smelt small cold-water silvery fish; migrate between salt and fresh water
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Smelt imp. & p. p. of Smell.
    • Smelt A gull; a simpleton.
    • Smelt (Zoöl) Any one of numerous species of small silvery salmonoid fishes of the genus Osmerus and allied genera, which ascend rivers to spawn, and sometimes become landlocked in lakes. They are esteemed as food, and have a peculiar odor and taste.
    • v. t Smelt (Metal) To melt or fuse, as, ore, for the purpose of separating and refining the metal; hence, to reduce; to refine; to flux or scorify; as, to smelt tin.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • smelt To fuse; melt; specifically, to treat (ore) in the large way, and chiefly in a furnace or by the aid of heat, for the purpose of separating the contained metal. Metallurgical operations carried on in the moist way, as the amalgamation of gold and silver ores in pans, treatment by lixiviation, etc., are not generally designated by the term smelting. Establishments where this is done are more commonly called mills or reduction-works, and those in which iron is smelted are usually designated as blast-furnaces or iron-furnaces. The various smelting operations differ greatly from each other, according to the nature of the combinations operated on. Simple ores, like galena, require only a very simple series of operations, which are essentially continuous in one and the same furnace; more complicated combinations, like the mixtures of various cupriferous ores smelted at Swansea by the English method, require several successive operations, entirely disconnected from each other, and performed in different furnaces. In the most general way, the essential order of succession of the various processes by which the sulphureted ores (and most ores are sulphurets) are treated is as follows:
    • smelt To fuse; melt; dissolve.
    • n smelt Any one of various small fishes. A small fish of the family Argentinidæ and the genus Osmerus, The common European smelt is the sparling, O. eperlanus; it becomes about 10 to 12 inches long, and is of an olive-green above and a silvery white below, with a silver longitudinal lateral band. It exhales when fresh a peculiar scent suggesting the cucumber. This fish is prized as a delicacy. The corresponding American smelt is O. mordax, of the Atlantic coast from Virginia northward, anadromous to some extent, and otherwise very similar to the sparling. There are several true smelts of the Pacific coast of North America, as O. thaleichthys, the Californian smelts and O. dentex, the Alaska smelt.
    • n smelt A gull; a simpleton.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Smelt smelt a fish of the salmon or trout family, having a cucumber-like smell and a delicious flavour.
    • v.t Smelt smelt to melt ore in order to separate the metal
    • ***

Quotations

  • Josh Billings
    Josh%20Billings
    “Flattery is like cologne water, to be smelt, not swallowed.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Of foreign origin; cf. Sw. smälta, D. smelten, Dan. smelte, Icel. smelta, G. schmelzen, OHG. smelzan, smelzen,; probably akin to Gr. . Cf. Enamel Melt Mute (v. i.) Smalt
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Scand., Sw. smälta, to smelt.

Usage

In literature:

Old Laird Fisher was trundling a wheelbarrow on the bank of the smelting-house.
"A Son of Hagar" by Sir Hall Caine
A school of smelt, seeking the quiet water of the bank, fought their way upstream.
"Lady Luck" by Hugh Wiley
Suddenly he smelt the acrid odour of burning cotton.
"Casa Braccio, Volumes 1 and 2 (of 2)" by F. Marion Crawford
It smelt very cold and mysterious.
"Fairy Prince and Other Stories" by Eleanor Hallowell Abbott
So then I smelt something deeper.
"Stingaree" by E. W. (Ernest William) Hornung
For instance, a copper ore may be smelted and a 99% recovery obtained.
"Principles of Mining" by Herbert C. Hoover
One of the youngsters with me, bruising the bracken and snuffing it, said it smelt of almond and cucumber.
"Waiting for Daylight" by Henry Major Tomlinson
Where Milton forges and smelts, his gold is native.
"A History of English Literature" by George Saintsbury
She was fond of perfumes, and this seemed to her the most delicious thing she ever smelt.
"Nine Little Goslings" by Susan Coolidge
As I idled about it, I smelt a curious odor of melting rubber.
"The Golden Face" by William Le Queux
The damp, heavy air that they breathed smelt of sugar and tallow and carrion.
"Germinie Lacerteux" by Edmond and Jules de Goncourt
If smelting goes up another fifteen points to-morrow Fitz goes with it.
"Colonel Carter's Christmas and The Romance of an Old-Fashioned Gentleman" by F. Hopkinson Smith
And it smelt sour and sickly.
"The Rough Road" by William John Locke
They require to be dressed much the same as smelts, being considered as a species of fresh-water smelts.
"The Cook and Housekeeper's Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches," by Mary Eaton
The street looked mean, the store smelt stale, and all was dreary.
"Partners of the Out-Trail" by Harold Bindloss
He went back to the table and poured out more whiskey, smelt it and drank it down raw.
"The Missionary" by George Griffith
He touched it gently, and found that it was swathed and bound up with leaves that smelt sleepily sweet and cool.
"The Three Mulla-mulgars" by Walter De La Mare
The ore is concentrated locally and is smelted and refined in plants at Eliseyna, Pirdop, and the Medet complex near Panagyurishte.
"Area Handbook for Bulgaria" by Eugene K. Keefe, Violeta D. Baluyut, William Giloane, Anne K. Long, James M. Moore, and Neda A. Walpole
Before evening all The Beasts had smelt the blood on my knife, and were running from me like hares.
"Rewards and Fairies" by Rudyard Kipling
The place smelt of the refuse of the Pit, and that odour mixed with the clean, wholesome aroma of the pines in our nostrils throughout the day.
"From Sea to Sea" by Rudyard Kipling
***

In poetry:

YOU smelt the Heaven-blossoms,
And all the sweet embosoms
The dear
Uranian year.
"To The Dead Cardinal Of Westminster" by Francis Thompson
And smelt the wall-flower in the crag
Whereon that dainty waft had fed,
Which made the bell-hung cowslip wag
Her delicate head;
"The Letter L" by Jean Ingelow
Still struggling, faint, he led her on
Tow'rd the fatal bow'r,
So still--so dim--while all along
Sweet smelt each blushing flow'r.
"The Lass Of Fair Wone" by Charlotte Dacre
All night in dreams, for I smelt,
In the rain-wet woods and fields,
The coming flowers and the glad green hours
That summer yields.
"Intimation" by Cale Young Rice
The sun had dried the garden seat;
The tall lithe flax nor bent nor swayed;
The tassels of the lime smelt sweet
Within the circle of its shade.
"Nature And the Book" by Alfred Austin
When the body might tree, and there was use in walking,
In October time — crystal air-time and free words were talking.
In my mind with light tunes and bright streams ran free.
When the earth smelt leaves shone and air and cloud had glee.
"When the body might free" by Ivor Gurney

In news:

It's springtime, which in Duluth means the smelt are running.
Duluth Puppet Troupe Puts On Smelt Fest For Earth Day.
Gloria Baker, branch manager at First Niagara of Lewiston, a NRRCC board of directors member and treasurer, is shown with Ken Scibetta as the " Smelt King".
With the warm spring weather, anglers should be aware that smelt dipping is open on all waters at this time and anglers can take 2 gallons daily.
Smelt 's numbers began declining in the 1970s and '80s, and they took a significant downturn in the 1990s.
NOAA fish biologist Marc Romano, based in Portland, said there wasn't enough specific data about smelt 's migratory pathways to designate critical habitat in the ocean.
Salmon, Delta Smelt and other Fish Populations are at Risk of Becoming Extinct.
NOAA proposes listing smelt as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.
Wiggy's smelt brings back memories.
In the morning sports, Bob Dailey talks once in a while about the smelt Wiggy's serves on Sunday's.
Smelt Sands01 Click to enlarge.
Smelt are in the Cowlitz, Seagulls come.
Smelt are in the Cowlitz, Seagulls come Click to enlarge.
The modernized smelter will be powered exclusively by wholly owned hydropower and use Rio Tinto Alcan's proprietary AP40 smelting technology to reduce the smelter 's carbon dioxide emissions intensity by approximately 50.
Lovers of Minecraft Are Belting Out Odes to Digging and Smelting .
***

In science:

Here, Sc ≡ Smelt − S vibr where Smelt is the entropy of the metastable liquid phase, and S vibr is the entropy of an ideal amorphous-solid phase (ideal glass) in which only vibrations are active; C is nearly constant, and τ0 is the relaxation time in the high temperature limit.
Can experiments select the configurational component of excess entropy?
Circles represent the excess entropy of the liquid over the crystal, Sexc = Smelt − S crystal, calculated from experimental calorimetric data.
Can experiments select the configurational component of excess entropy?
The authors acknowledge the cooperation of the Kamioka Mining and Smelting Company.
Search for anti-electron-neutrinos from the Sun at Super-Kamiokande-I
Smelt, Fixed point varieties on the space of lattices, Bull.
Affine pavings for affine Springer fibers for split elements in PGL(3)
***