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prosody

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n prosody the study of poetic meter and the art of versification
    • n prosody the patterns of stress and intonation in a language
    • n prosody (prosody) a system of versification
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Prosody That part of grammar which treats of the quantity of syllables, of accent, and of the laws of versification or metrical composition.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n prosody The science of the quantity of syllables and of pronunciation as affecting versification; in a wider sense, metrics, or the elements of metrics, considered as a part of grammar (see metrics, 2).
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Prosody pros′ō-di that part of grammar which treats of quantity, accent, and the laws of verse or versification
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. prosodia, the tone or accent of a syllable, Gr. a song sung to, or with, an accompanying song, the accent accompanying the pronunciation; to + song, ode: cf. F. prosodie,. See Ode
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—L. prosōdia, Gr. prosōdiapros, to, ōdē, a song.

Usage

In literature:

You are under no earthly obligation to Messrs. Syntax and Prosody.
"The Emigrants Of Ahadarra The Works of William Carleton, Volume Two" by William Carleton
In the second place, why should not a pause play a part in prosody as well as in music?
"An Essay Toward a History of Shakespeare in Norway" by Martin Brown Ruud
The most serious, but the most excusable, is his contempt for prosody and his indifference to the verse entrusted to him.
"Musical Memories" by Camille Saint-Saëns
In verse, he composed many pieces, both in hexameters and elegiacs, together with a treatise on prosody.
"Early Britain" by Grant Allen
It is contained in that part of grammar called Prosody.
"Parker's Second Reader" by Richard G. Parker
It is believed that he wrote a treatise on Astronomy and one on Sanskrit Prosody.
"Tales from the Hindu Dramatists" by R. N. Dutta
The following are specimens of his prosodial notions of our English heroic metre.
"Early Reviews of English Poets" by John Louis Haney
As regards Bjoernson's prosody, I am aware that it is sometimes defective.
"Essays on Scandinavian Literature" by Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen
Difficulties of its prosody.
"The Flourishing of Romance and the Rise of Allegory" by George Saintsbury
These remarks are appreciated when we consider the comparative characters of the classical and the English prosody.
"The English Language" by Robert Gordon Latham
They should not encumber themselves with the shackles of a new prosody.
"The Literature of Ecstasy" by Albert Mordell
During his seven years of residence grammar, syntax, prosody were never mentioned.
"The Radicalism of Shelley and Its Sources" by Daniel J. MacDonald
Nobody has the copyright of any possible metre or rhythm in English prosody.
"The Letters of Ambrose Bierce" by Ambrose Bierce
His system is based primarily on Latin prosody, but reconciled with English usage.
"A History of Literary Criticism in the Renaissance" by Joel Elias Spingarn
But the whole tendency of the period has been to relax the stringency of French prosody.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 11, Slice 2" by Various
See Bl., Prosody, p. 12.
"The Sufistic Quatrains of Omar Khayyam" by Omar Khayyam
Rene de Ghil invented an entirely new system of prosody, which no one understood; least of all, the poet.
"Unicorns" by James Huneker
He has a good ear for rhythm; but we often find him tripping in his prosody.
"The Catholic World; Volume I, Issues 1-6" by E. Rameur
Ali-Shir himself could not have written anything neater, more absolutely correct in prosody.
"King-Errant" by Flora Annie Steel
It owes this conservation to its prosody.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 15, Slice 2" by Various
***

In poetry:

His love was gentle Prosody,
More fair than morning beam;
Who liv'd beneath a flowering tree,
Beside a falling stream.
"Sir Hornbook" by Thomas Love Peacock
They reach'd the tree where Prosody
Was singing in the shade:
Great joy Childe Launcelot had to see,
And hear that lovely maid.
"Sir Hornbook" by Thomas Love Peacock
And these two claim'd, with high pretence
The whole Parnassian ground,
Albeit some little difference
Between their taste was found:
Sir Syntax he was all for sense,
And Prosody for sound.
"Sir Hornbook" by Thomas Love Peacock

In news:

Aculab Adds Support for Linux with Prosody S Version 3.
Personality traits KW - prosody KW.
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In science:

Satisfaction of templates constraints is obligatory and is determined by the principles of prosody, both universal and language-specific.
Computing Prosodic Morphology
Also see (Wilkenfeld, 1981) for research on prosody and orthography.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Prosodic Patterns in Spoken English: Studies in the Correlation between Prosody and Grammar for Text-to-Speech Conversion, volume 76 of Lund Studies in English.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
In Ladd, D. R. and Cutler, A., editors, Prosody: Models and Measurements, pages 67–78.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
In Cutler, A. and R, L. D., editors, Prosody: Models and Measurements, pages 111–122.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
The English Tone of Voice: Essays in Intonation, Prosody, and Paralanguage.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Speakers’ conceptions of the functions of prosody.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
In Cutler, A. and Ladd, D. R., editors, Prosody: Models and Measurements, pages 79–92.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Prosody in speech to children: Prelinguistic and linguistic functions.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Prosody and focus in speech to infants and adults.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
In Cutler, A. and Ladd, D. R., editors, Prosody: Models and Measurements, pages 11–26.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
In Cutler, A. and Ladd, D. R., editors, Prosody: Models and Measurements, pages 93–110.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
In Cutler, A. and Ladd, D. R., editors, Prosody: Models and Measurements, pages 39–52.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Synthesis and perception of paragraph prosody.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Towards using prosody in speech recognition/understanding systems: Differences between read and spontaneous speech.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
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