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propitiation

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n propitiation the act of atoning for sin or wrongdoing (especially appeasing a deity)
    • n propitiation the act of placating and overcoming distrust and animosity
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Propitiation (Theol) That which propitiates; atonement or atoning sacrifice; specifically, the influence or effects of the death of Christ in appeasing the divine justice, and conciliating the divine favor. "He [Jesus Christ] is the propitiation for our sins."
    • Propitiation The act of appeasing the wrath and conciliating the favor of an offended person; the act of making propitious.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n propitiation The act of propitiating; the act of making propitious.
    • n propitiation That which propitiates or appeases; that which furnishes a reason for not executing a punishment justly due for wrong-doing; specifically, in the New Testament, Christ himself, because his life and death furnish a ground for the forgiveness of sins.
    • n propitiation Synonyms Atonement, Reconciliation, Propitiation, Expiation, Satisfaction. By derivation and by Biblical usage atonement and reconciliation are essentially the same: two that were alienated are made at one, or put back into friendship. Atonement, however, is not now applied to the relation of man to man, except in its extra-Biblical extension, by which it means also the making of full and satisfactory amends (satisfaction) or the enduring of proper penalties (expiation) for a great wrong: as, there could be no atonement for such an outrage. As applied to the relations of God and man, atonement has been lifted into much greater dignity than any other word in the list; it is now the august, chosen, and only endeared word for the effect of the life and especially of the death of Christ in establishing right relations between God and man; reconcile and reconciliation are the principal words for this in the New Testament, atonement being used only once, and atone not at all. Propitiation is the only one of these words having exclusive reference to the feelings or purposes of the person or being offended; it is a severe word, implying slowness to relent, and is, in regard to the attitude of God toward man, chiefly a theological term. Expiation regards the guilt of the offense; it is the suffering of the penalty proper for an act (as, to make expiation for one's crime upon the scaffold), or of an adequate substituted pain. The word is general, and only barely Biblical (Num. xxxv. 33, margin, and revised version), although the fact is by the mass of Christians believed to lie in some form in the sufferings of Christ. Satisfaction in this connection means adequate amends: as, satisfaction for an insult or for damage; the word has been taken by a school in theology to express the sufficiency of the sufferings of Christ to meet the demands of the retributive justice of God.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Propitiation act of propitiating:
    • ns Propitiation (theol.) that which propitiates: atonement: the death of Christ as a ground of the forgiveness of sin
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. propitiatio,: cf. F. propitiation,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. propitiāre, -ātum, to make favourable—propitius, well disposed; orig. perh. an augur's term with reference to the flying of birds—pro, forward, petĕre, to seek, orig. fly; by others conn. with prope, near.

Usage

In literature:

The moment is propitious.
"Cinq Mars, Complete" by Alfred de Vigny
Are the fates propitious?
"Herb of Grace" by Rosa Nouchette Carey
They stayed there for three days, waiting for a propitious, moonless night and roaming singly round the outskirts of the park.
"The Hollow Needle" by Maurice Leblanc
Everything had turned out most propitiously for Mrs. Peck, so far.
"Mr. Hogarth's Will" by Catherine Helen Spence
His antecedents were less propitious.
"Imperial Purple" by Edgar Saltus
On the second day fortune was propitious.
"Our Friend the Charlatan" by George Gissing
It is thus one seeks to propitiate the evil powers, to turn the edge of their blows by meekness.
"Demos" by George Gissing
To them chance and destiny always are one; but chance will be seldom propitious if accepted as destiny.
"Wisdom and Destiny" by Maurice Maeterlinck
At midnight I left Admiral Porter on his gunboat; he had his fleet ready and the night was propitious.
"The Memoirs of General W. T. Sherman, Complete" by William T. Sherman
On each propitious occasion he had made love to her extravagantly.
"The Pit" by Frank Norris
With this idea came also the sentiment of PROPITIATION.
"A Romance of Two Worlds" by Marie Corelli
Hail the occasion propitious, O British young!
"The Ordeal of Richard Feverel, Complete" by George Meredith
She thought it proper to punish him for his good looks till propitiated by his good temper.
"Sandra Belloni, Complete" by George Meredith
O thou lord of birds, be propitious to us who solicit thy mercy!
"The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1"
Such being the case, all of us, with our counsellors, shall propitiate Yudhishthira the son of Kunti.
"The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2"
Among the Romans and ancient Persians rivers were propitiated by sacrifices.
"Rambles and Recollections of an Indian Official" by William Sleeman
Mrs. Jennings was easily propitiated on receiving the attention which was due to her.
"A Houseful of Girls" by Sarah Tytler
Nor did Cyprian think them propitious when taken into counsel.
"Mary Gray" by Katharine Tynan
The times were propitious for the elevation to office of those of humble origin.
"Watch Yourself Go By" by Al. G. Field
Then look propitious from thy throne, And take this temple for thine own.
"The International Monthly Magazine, Volume 5, No. 1, January, 1852" by Various
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In poetry:

For Thou art God alone,
To tender pity prone,
Propitious unto all
Who on thy mercy call.
"My God, Thy Suppliant Hear" by George Sandys
I have been Glyn Dwr set in the vast night,
Scanning the stars for the propitious omen,
A leader of men, yet cursed by the crazed women
Mourning their dead under the same stars.
"Taliesin" by R S Thomas
Heaven! shed thy most propitious dews around!
Ye holy stars! look down with tender eyes,
And gild and guard and consecrate the ground
Where we may rest, and whence we pray to rise.
"Hymn - Consecration of Magnolia Cemetery" by Henry Timrod
But ask of elder days, earth's vernal hour,
When in familiar talk God's voice was heard,
When at the Patriarch's call the fiery shower
Propitious o'er the turf-built shrine appeared.
"Second Sunday In Lent" by John Keble
You that on Stars do look,
Arrest not there your sight,
Though Natures fairest Book,
And signed with propitious light;
Our Blessing now is more Divine,
Then Planets that at Noon did shine.
"A Short Hymn Upon The Birth Of Prince Charles" by Sir Henry Wotton
O say what soft propitious hour
I best may chuse to hail thy power,
And court thy gentle sway?
When Autumn, friendly to the Muse,
Shall thy own modest tints diffuse,
And shed thy milder day.
"Hymn To Content" by Anna Laetitia Aikin Barbauld

In news:

A History of the Propitious Esculent .
In the cyclical time of the Hindu world, history moves drowsily through the ordered, unchanging world of rituals and festivals, and a God who pervades everything and must be propitiated for everything.
Maladies like swine flu, malaria and AIDS aren't caused by micro-organisms, they claim, but by the displeasure of gods, whom they propitiate by praying, consulting shamans and sacrificing goats.
A History of the Propitious Esculent.
Madrid –Outgoing Socialist Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, of Spain, had until recently been the beneficiary of propitious circumstances.
Unlike when the Indians traded Cliff Lee in 2009 as the dog days were just beginning to yip, they might have traded Shin-Soo Choo at the most propitious time.
It's a propitious time for the subjects of Dave Eggers' 2009 book "Zeitoun," Abdulraham and Kathy Zeitoun, to visit East Lansing.
Back in the Golden Age of the detective novel the luxury passenger train provided a propitious setting for the required murder and the subsequent mystery.
For Verizon, the timing is propitious.
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In science:

To get sufficiently good estimates which lead to the proof of Propitiation 1 we have to exploit the improvements following from the above sketched observations.
An estimate about multiple stochastic integrals with respect to a normalized empirical measure
In fact, circumstances might be more propitious toward wind creation in this region than in the disk, for the Alfven speed should be rather higher due to the similar strength magnetic field and the much smaller inertia (cf. the simulations reported in ).
Magnetic Extraction of Spin Energy from a Black Hole
This meeting, which was planned as a specialist discussion on the details of emission mechanisms in extragalactic radio sources, was held at a propitious time.
Particles and Fields in Radio Galaxies: A Summary
Recently, hybrid metal-graphene plasmonic structures have been proposed as the propitious platform for novel optical devices .
Nonlinear graphene plasmonics: amplitude equation
For our purposes, it is propitious to choose periodic boundary conditions (PBCs) with equal periods L1 = L2 = L, L even, and with N = L2 sites.
Parent Hamiltonian for the Chiral Spin Liquid
Note here that it is propitious to use the Henkin solution of the ∂ problem—see [HEN].
Deformations of Strongly Pseudoconvex Domains
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