Another posts

pepin the short definition unerringly definition ventral horn definition nonny meaning onion eyed shakespeare definition pulling wool uncloistered nun uproarious in a sentence throw rug definition coach's office fish geranium jamaica etymology automotive technology definition unstanched definition standing rules definition cotton gin meaning levy war fine julienne definition tunica transparency a roland for an oliver succedaneous definition heptastich definition fevered pitch ectoparasite examples asperous definition global organization definition alackaday definition anthological definition gauss meter definition plane figure definition definition of dush double eagle steak house meaning endurant definition legal power

lionise

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v lionise assign great social importance to "The film director was celebrated all over Hollywood","The tenor was lionized in Vienna"
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • lionise See lionize.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Lionise to treat as a lion or object of interest
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. lion—L. leon-em—Gr. leōn; Ger. löwe.

Usage

In literature:

He was acknowledged, fawned upon, in a way lionised.
"Sister Carrie" by Theodore Dreiser
He was acknowledged, fawned upon, in a way lionised.
"Sister Carrie" by Theodore Dreiser
He had no wish to be lionised.
"The Weavers, Complete" by Gilbert Parker
Further on they stumbled over a small boy from the charity school who wished to lionise them over the whole building.
"The History of David Grieve" by Mrs. Humphry Ward
In Paris and London especially he was lionised to the top of his bent.
"Chambers's Edinburgh Journal Vol. XVII. No. 418. New Series." by William and Robert Chambers
But he was never lionised.
"The Lion's Share" by E. Arnold Bennett
Did he want to marry you, or only to lionise you?
"Charlotte Bronte and Her Circle" by Clement K. Shorter
Come along, my boy," said Lionise; "I'll introduce you at once to the whole party, and then you can make your own selection.
"The English Spy" by Bernard Blackmantle
They tried to lionise me in drawing rooms and make me talk for their entertainment.
"The Shrieking Pit" by Arthur J. Rees
Mr Fordyce, before lionising the place with Nowell, assisted me in making all possible inquiries for Mr Coventry and Alfred.
"My First Voyage to Southern Seas" by W.H.G. Kingston
London, eager for a lion, lionised Ericson.
"The Dictator" by Justin McCarthy
Patty was lionised until she became almost embarrassed at being made so prominent.
"Patty's Friends" by Carolyn Wells
You know your parent's horror of being lionised, and will not be surprised to hear that I am half dead of it.
"The Letters of Charles Dickens" by Charles Dickens
I had only met her once before, but she took it into her head to lionise me.
"The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde
The next day Scotty found that he was not yet through with his lionising.
"The Silver Maple" by Marian Keith
Wherever we go, we are lionised and loaded with congratulations and condolence.
"The Pearl of the Antilles, or An Artist in Cuba" by Walter Goodman
English society lionised Thackeray for his pictures of it.
"The Grandchildren of the Ghetto" by Israel Zangwill
It is a species of lionising that I have now got hardened to.
"The Cruise of the Land-Yacht "Wanderer"" by Gordon Stables
Fashionable London was never able to 'lionise' Bohemian Borrow.
"The Story of Seville" by Walter M. Gallichan
People are now pleased not only to meet artists socially, but to lionise them as well.
"Memoirs of an American Prima Donna" by Clara Louise Kellogg
***

In news:

WorldCom's Bernie Ebbers typified the lionised chief executive.
***