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hypallage

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n hypallage reversal of the syntactic relation of two words (as in `her beauty's face')
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Hypallage (Gram) A figure consisting of a transference of attributes from their proper subjects to others. Thus Virgil says, “dare classibus austros,” to give the winds to the fleets, instead of dare classibus austris, to give the fleets to the winds. "The hypallage, of which Virgil is fonder than any other writer, is much the gravest fault in language."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n hypallage In grammar and rhetoric, a figure which consists in inversion of syntactical relation between two words, each assuming the construction which in accordance with ordinary usage would have been assigned to the Other. Thus, in Virgil (Æneid, iii. 61), “dare classibus austros” (to give the winds to the fleets) is substituted for the usual construction “dare classes austris” (to give the fleets to the winds); the dative and accusative— that is, the indirect and direct objects—having been interchanged. Hypallage is a bold departure from the customary mode of expression, and is almost entirely confined to poetry.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Hypallage hi-pal′a-jē (rhet.) a figure in which the relations of things in a sentence are mutually interchanged, but without obscuring the sense.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L., fr. Gr., prop., interchange, exchange, fr, to interchange; under + to change
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—L.,—Gr. hypallassein, to interchange—hypo, under, alassein, to change.

Usage

In literature:

I understand your synecdoche, or do I mean hypallage?
"Wilderness of Spring" by Edgar Pangborn
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