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harborage

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n harborage (nautical) a place of refuge (as for a ship)
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Harborage Shelter; entertainment. "Where can I get me harborage for the night?"
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n harborage Lodging; shelter; dwelling; abode.
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Usage

In literature:

One harborage sufficed for son and sire.
"The Oedipus Trilogy" by Sophocles
And, as the evil spirit had left Hiram's house, so had another and a greater evil spirit quitted its harborage.
"Howard Pyle's Book of Pirates" by Howard Pyle
So Phyllis, from the troubled waters of doubt, came at last to safe harborage.
"Mavericks" by William MacLeod Raine
The subtle sophistry of this way of putting it found grateful harborage in Elizabeth's hungry soul.
"Double Trouble" by Herbert Quick
It was all very well to dilate upon the sugar crop of the island, its trade, its fertility, its harborage.
"Benjamin Franklin" by John Torrey Morse, Jr.
Carol would have offered it harborage long before.
"Prudence Says So" by Ethel Hueston
And, as the evil spirit had left Hiram's house, so had another and a greater evil spirit quitted its harborage.
"Howard Pyle's Book of Pirates" by Howard I. Pyle
An iron coast, bleak, black, and desolate, without harborage for so much as a catboat for leagues to north or south.
"Kings in Exile" by Sir Charles George Douglas Roberts
Closets and pantries there are none, for they would only furnish good harborage for woods-rats and other vermin.
"Our Southern Highlanders" by Horace Kephart
These three bays furnish ample and safe harborage for all the merchant fleets of the world.
"Peculiarities of American Cities" by Willard Glazier
No town stretched out its sheltering walls before him; there was scarcely harborage for his ships.
"Mexico" by Susan Hale
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