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diarthrosis

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n diarthrosis a joint so articulated as to move freely
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Diarthrosis (Anat) A form of articulation which admits of considerable motion; a complete joint; abarticulation. See Articulation.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n diarthrosis In anatomy, that articulation of bones which leaves them free to move in some or any direction; free, as distinguished from fixed, arthrosis; thorough-joint: applied both to the joints themselves and to the motion resulting from such mechanism. The principal kinds of articulation thus designated are enarthrosis, or ball-and-socket joint, the freest of all, as seen in the hip and shoulder; ginglymus, or hinge-joint, as in the elbow and knee; and cyclarthrosix, or pivot-joint. See arthrosis. Also called abarthrosis.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Diarthrosis dī-ar-thrō′sis the general name for all forms of articulation which admit of the motion of one bone upon another, free arthrosis—including Enarthrosis, Ginglymus, and Cyclarthrosis.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
NL., fr. Gr., fr. to joint, articulate; dia` through, asunder + to fasten by a joint, 'a`rqron joint
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr.

Usage

In literature:

Diarthrosis: any articulation that permits of motion.
"Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology" by John. B. Smith
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