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crush

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v crush break into small pieces "The car crushed the toy"
    • v crush become injured, broken, or distorted by pressure "The plastic bottle crushed against the wall"
    • v crush come out better in a competition, race, or conflict "Agassi beat Becker in the tennis championship","We beat the competition","Harvard defeated Yale in the last football game"
    • v crush make ineffective "Martin Luther King tried to break down racial discrimination"
    • v crush crush or bruise "jam a toe"
    • v crush to compress with violence, out of natural shape or condition "crush an aluminum can","squeeze a lemon"
    • v crush humiliate or depress completely "She was crushed by his refusal of her invitation","The death of her son smashed her"
    • v crush come down on or keep down by unjust use of one's authority "The government oppresses political activists"
    • n crush the act of crushing
    • n crush temporary love of an adolescent
    • n crush a dense crowd of people
    • n crush leather that has had its grain pattern accentuated
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: In 4000 BC Egypt, men and women wore glitter eye shadow made from the crushed shells of beetles.
    • Crush A violent collision or compression; a crash; destruction; ruin. "The wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds."
    • v. i Crush krŭsh To be or become broken down or in, or pressed into a smaller compass, by external weight or force; as, an eggshell crushes easily.
    • Crush To oppress or burden grievously. "Thou shalt be only oppressed and crushed alway."
    • Crush To overcome completely; to subdue totally. "Speedily overtaking and crushing the rebels."
    • Crush To overwhelm by pressure or weight; to beat or force down, as by an incumbent weight. "To crush the pillars which the pile sustain.""Truth, crushed to earth, shall rise again."
    • Crush To press or bruise between two hard bodies; to squeeze, so as to destroy the natural shape or integrity of the parts, or to force together into a mass; as, to crush grapes. "Ye shall not offer unto the Lord that which is bruised, or crushed, or broken, or cut.""The ass . . . thrust herself unto the wall, and crushed Balaam's foot against the wall."
    • Crush To reduce to fine particles by pounding or grinding; to comminute; as, to crush quartz.
    • Crush to subdue or overwhelm (a person) by argument or a cutting remark; to cause (a person) to feel chagrin or humiliation; to squelch.
    • Crush Violent pressure, as of a crowd; a crowd which produced uncomfortable pressure; as, a crush at a reception. "Politics leave very little time for the bow window at White's in the day, or for the crush room of the opera at night."
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: American colonists discovered that superior candles could be made from the fruit of a squat bush growing in the sand dunes along the New England seashore. The small, grayish bayberry was picked, crushed, and boiled. It had to be skimmed several times before the pale, nearly transparent, green fat was sufficiently refined. Bayberry candles were highly prized, because so much labor and so many berries were needed to make just one candle.
    • crush To press and bruise between two hard bodies; squeeze out of shape or normal condition.
    • crush To bruise and break into fragments or small particles, either by direct pressure or by grinding or pounding: as, to crush quartz.
    • crush To force down and bruise and break, as by a superincumbent weight: as, the man was crushed by the fall of a tree.
    • crush To put down; overpower; subdue absolutely; conquer beyond resistance: as, to crush one's enemies.
    • crush To oppress grievously.
    • crush To crowd or press upon.
    • crush To rumple or put out of shape by pressure or by rough handling: as, to crush a bonnet or a dress.
    • crush To destroy; frustrate: as, to crush out rebellion.
    • crush Synonyms Mash, etc. See dash.
    • crush To break, pound, pulverize, crumble, bray, disintegrate, demolish.
    • crush To overpower, prostrate, conquer, quell.
    • crush To be pressed out of shape, into a smaller compass, or into pieces, by external force: as, an egg-shell crushes readily in the hand.
    • n crush A violent collision or rushing together; a sudden or violent pressure; a breaking or bruising by pressure or by violent collision or rushing together.
    • n crush Violent pressure caused by a crowd; a mass of objects crowded together; a compacted and obstructing crowd of persons, as at a ball or reception.
    • n crush In Australia, a funnel-shaped, fenced lane or passageway for cattle.
    • n crush In coal-mining: A general settlement of the strata above a coal-mine, due to failure of the pillars: generally accompanied by numerous local falls of roof-rocks in the workings.
    • n crush A species of fault in coal.
    • n crush The amount of cotton-seed crushed for oil during a given season: as, a large crush.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Soy milk, the liquid left after beans have been crushed in hot water and strained, is a favorite beverage in the East. In Hong Kong, soy milk is as popular as Coca-Cola is in the U.S.
    • v.t Crush krush to break or bruise: to squeeze together: to beat down or overwhelm: to subdue: to ruin
    • v.i Crush to become broken under pressure
    • n Crush a violet squeezing: a vast crowd of persons or things
    • ***

Quotations

  • Mao Zedong
    Mao%20Zedong
    “Communism is not love. Communism is a hammer which we use to crush the enemy.”
  • William Shakespeare
    William%20Shakespeare
    “When you fear a foe, fear crushes your strength; and this weakness gives strength to your opponents.”
  • Henri Frederic Amiel
    Henri%20Frederic%20Amiel
    “Destiny has two ways of crushing us -- by refusing our wishes and by fulfilling them.”
  • Francis Bacon
    Francis%20Bacon
    “Ill Fortune never crushed that man whom good fortune deceived not.”
  • Ian Mcewan
    Ian Mcewan
    “By measuring individual human worth, the novelist reveals the full enormity of the State's crime when it sets out to crush that individuality.”
  • Mark Twain
    Mark%20Twain
    “Forgiveness is the fragrance the violet sheds on the heel that has crushed it.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. cruschen, crousshen, Of. cruisir, croissir, fr. LL. cruscire, prob. of Ger. origin, from a derivative of the word seen in Goth. kruistan, to gnash; akin to Sw. krysta, to squeeze, Dan. kryste, Icel. kreysta,

Usage

In literature:

After picking, the leaves are partly crushed and allowed to wilt until they begin to turn brown in color.
"Commercial Geography" by Jacques W. Redway
Had it not been for Rosen I would have crushed him under the wheels of my phaeton.
"Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern — Volume 11" by Various
The war had lasted for three years and the rebellion was not crushed.
"The Political History of England - Vol. X." by William Hunt
A slight effort would have crushed the fingers out of all semblance of symmetry and beauty.
"Deerfoot in The Mountains" by Edward S. Ellis
When they left the shop, Daniel held the mask under his arm so tightly that the paper wrapping was crushed, if the mask itself was not.
"The Goose Man" by Jacob Wassermann
It is also called "sweet birch," because its young twigs, when crushed, give out a pleasant aromatic odour.
"Popular Adventure Tales" by Mayne Reid
Ferdinand had crushed Protestantism in every estate he owned.
"The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 11" by Various
But that man was not crushed by his misfortunes; he seemed to crush them.
"A Son of Hagar" by Sir Hall Caine
He had heard the enthusiastic shouts of 1792, and then the dull groans of the people crushed under the heel of the conqueror.
"The Son of Monte Christo" by Jules Lermina
A master hand has organized a conspiracy in Congress to crush the President.
"The Clansman" by Thomas Dixon
Jimmy had him under his heel, with that crushing lawsuit.
"The Bill-Toppers" by Andre Castaigne
Peel was crushingly defeated.
"A History of the Nineteenth Century, Year by Year" by Edwin Emerson
Let but a snow-ball roll, and you and your houses and your towns are crushed and swept away.
"Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen" by Hans Christian Andersen
Every house around them, she said, was crushed, and the people either killed or drowned.
"The Johnstown Horror" by James Herbert Walker
With her hundred hands she grasped her foes in every region under heaven, and crushed them with resistless energy.
"Cotton is King and The Pro-Slavery Arguments" by Various
And, as always on sensing that inner division, Daoud felt a crushing sadness.
"The Saracen: Land of the Infidel" by Robert Shea
Her anguish was like a giant's hand that had seized her heart and was crushing it.
"The Saracen: The Holy War" by Robert Shea
Legs, arms, bodies, are crushed.
"My Days and Nights on the Battle-Field" by Charles Carleton Coffin
But these joys, being hollow, were, ere long, crushed in.
"Shirley" by Charlotte Brontë
Her mood was crushed by this inexorable return to the subject she had been chattering to avert.
"Coquette" by Frank Swinnerton
***

In poetry:

Man can tear it,
Crush it, destroy it;
Uproot the trailers,
The thumb-shaped leafmgs.
"Ode To Walt Whitman" by Stephen Vincent Benet
A rose beneath your feet
Has fallen from my head;
Its odour rises sweet,
All crushed it lies, and dead.
"The First Extra" by Amy Levy
Let me press my heart out on thee,
Crush it like a fiery vine,
Spilling sacramental on thee
Love's red wine.
"Love-Trilogy" by Mathilde Blind
But Oh! when human pleasures rise,
To enviable height;
How subtly dark misfortune flies,
To crush them in her flight.
"The Halcyon" by William Hayley
"I call for helpers, but in vain;
Then has my gospel none?
Well, mine own arm has might enough
To crush my foes alone.
"Hymn 29" by Isaac Watts
O ye words that sound so hollow
As I now recall your tone!
What are ye but empty echoes
Of a passion crushed and gone?
"The Buried Flower" by William Edmondstoune Aytoun

In news:

Crushed dreams of a retirement condo in Vero Beach.
On a chilly February night in Los Angeles, attendees at the DomainFest Global Conference crushed together in a tent at the Playboy Mansion for cocktails and dancing.
Not with that kind of crushing - and exploding - debt.
How Communism crushed the Faberge egg.
A Lower Valley orchard worker was crushed to death by a tractor on Saturday evening.
Professor Avishai refers to "the Syrian army's murderous crushing of Fatah at the Tel-a-Zaatar refugee camp in early 1977" in his article, "Begin vs Begin" ( NYR, May 31).
The "Fringe" and "Revolution" EP admits the WB drama is still his favorite: "It was just sort of pure romantic, sweet characters who had crushes on one another and were dealing with which party to go.".
Cracking the books, having crushes, living in dorms.
Ever urgent as the clock runs down, Barack Obama's and Mitt Romney's teams have been pressing voters to get to the polls while thousands who are already there have waited in long lines for their final chance to avoid the Election Day crush.
Ever urgent as the clock ran down, Barack Obama's and Mitt Romney's teams pressed voters to get to the polls while thousands who were already there waited in long lines for their final chance to avoid the Election Day crush.
Ever urgent as the clock ran down, Barack Obama's and Mitt Romney's teams pressed voters Monday to get to the polls while thousands who were already there waited in long lines for their final chance to avoid the Election Day crush.
The New York Giants may have crushed the Green Bay Packers on Sunday night, but the victory came at a stiff price: running back Andre Brown suffered a broken fibula .
Flatbed truck loses control, crushes Acura.
The Warriors crushed the Patriots 19-0 in their first win of the season.
Our latest designer crush (and guy we'd like to spend an evening hanging out with), Thom Browne, showed a collection-installation piece in Florence last week.
***

In science:

Steps 2 and 4 make use of the Jaco-Rubinstein crushing process, which modifies a triangulation by “destructively” crushing a normal surface within it.
A fast branching algorithm for unknot recognition with experimental polynomial-time behaviour
Given a normal surface S within a triangulation T, we cut T open along S and then crush all of the triangles and quadrilaterals of S (which now appear twice each on the boundary) to points.
A fast branching algorithm for unknot recognition with experimental polynomial-time behaviour
A key result of Jaco and Rubinstein is that, if S is a sphere or a disc and the underlying 3-manifold is sufficiently simple, then any topological changes that result from this crushing are of limited types, and can be easily detected.
A fast branching algorithm for unknot recognition with experimental polynomial-time behaviour
To obtain the O(n) running time, we perform the crushing process as follows.
A fast branching algorithm for unknot recognition with experimental polynomial-time behaviour
We then identify how their faces are glued together after crushing, by following chains of tetrahedra through T that do not survive (i.e., do contain quadrilaterals of S ).
A fast branching algorithm for unknot recognition with experimental polynomial-time behaviour
If, after crushing, any connected component of the resulting triangulation has torus boundary then we can take this as the new triangulation T ′ .
A fast branching algorithm for unknot recognition with experimental polynomial-time behaviour
Because S is not the vertex link, it contains at least one quadrilateral and so crushing will strictly reduce the number of tetrahedra.
A fast branching algorithm for unknot recognition with experimental polynomial-time behaviour
There are two stages: (i) the Jaco-Rubinstein crushing process, and (ii) extracting the connected component with torus boundary (if any).
A fast branching algorithm for unknot recognition with experimental polynomial-time behaviour
This is enough to distinguish between components with torus boundary (χ = 0) and sphere boundary (χ = 1), which from earlier are the only possible scenarios after crushing.
A fast branching algorithm for unknot recognition with experimental polynomial-time behaviour
Our remaining task is to show that the Jaco-Rubinstein crushing process can be carried out in O(n) time.
A fast branching algorithm for unknot recognition with experimental polynomial-time behaviour
It is simple to identify which tetrahedra of T survive the crushing process (those whose corresponding quadrilateral coordinates in S are all zero)—the challenge is to identify how the faces of these surviving tetrahedra are to be glued together.
A fast branching algorithm for unknot recognition with experimental polynomial-time behaviour
Each step in such a path takes O(1) time to compute (since all we need to know is which, if any, of the three quadrilateral coordinates is non-zero in the next tetrahedron), and so the gluings in the final crushed triangulation can be computed in total O(n) time.
A fast branching algorithm for unknot recognition with experimental polynomial-time behaviour
Given such a surface, Lemma 5 shows that we can crush it in O(n) time to obtain a new triangulation of K with strictly fewer tetrahedra.
A fast branching algorithm for unknot recognition with experimental polynomial-time behaviour
Ideally we would take S to be the surface “immediately surrounding” e (that is, the frontier of a regular neighbourhood of e); then crushing S would have the effect of crushing the edge e itself, as illustrated earlier in Figure 9.
A fast branching algorithm for unknot recognition with experimental polynomial-time behaviour
It is well known that the global market is far from being at equilibrium, the collective behavior of the market can occasionally have violent bursts (rallies or crushes) and these violent events follow some empirically well established scaling laws.
A Prototype Model of Stock Exchange
***