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crick

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v crick twist (a body part) into a strained position "crick your neck"
    • n Crick English biochemist who (with Watson in 1953) helped discover the helical structure of DNA (1916-2004)
    • n crick a painful muscle spasm especially in the neck or back (`rick' and `wrick' are British)
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Rosalind Franklin was the woman behind Watson and Crick's doudle helix DNA model. She did all the experiments, but died before she was paid credit. Watson and Crick merely took her results and interpreted it.
    • Crick A painful, spasmodic affection of the muscles of some part of the body, as of the neck or back, rendering it difficult to move the part. "To those also that, with a crick or cramp, have thei necks drawn backward."
    • Crick A small jackscrew.
    • n Crick krĭk The creaking of a door, or a noise resembling it.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • crick To creak.
    • n crick A creaking. as of a door.
    • n crick An inlet of the sea or a river: same as creek
    • n crick A small stream; a brook: same as creek, 2, which is the usual spelling, though generally pronounced in the United States as crick.
    • n crick A crevice; chink; cranny; corner.
    • n crick A painful spasmodic affection of some part of the body, as of the neck or back, in the nature of a cramp or transient stiffness, making motion of the part difficult.
    • n crick A small jackscrew.
    • crick To wrench or sprain: as, to crick one's neck.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Crick krik a spasm or cramp of the muscles, esp. of the neck.
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
The same as creek, a bending, twisting. See Creek Crook
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Prob. onomatopœic.

Usage

In literature:

When we get the other three, we'll rid Oak Crick of five of its worst citizens.
"Polly and Eleanor" by Lillian Elizabeth Roy
If yous folks hadn't gone gallivantin' off down the crick that day this would never 'a' happened.
"Treasure Valley" by Marian Keith
Down the crick erbout a mile Elhannon Howard lives.
"Chit-Chat; Nirvana; The Searchlight" by Mathew Joseph Holt
Besides, it gives me a crick in my neck to be always listening to some one behind.
"The Lightning Conductor Discovers America" by C. N. (Charles Norris) Williamson and A. M. (Alice Muriel) Williamson
I've sot and sot at that air front winder till I've got a crick in my back a tryin' to find out whether it's lamb or mutton.
"The Universal Reciter" by Various
Bill's got a crick in his back yet, where Lance knocked him over the edge of a card table.
"Rim o' the World" by B. M. Bower
Sounds like somebody slappin' the crick with a fishin'-pole.
"The Duke Of Chimney Butte" by G. W. Ogden
I reckum she's gone to de crick.
"Cloudy Jewel" by Grace Livingston Hill
I wuz down with a crick at the time and Samantha had to nuss me.
"Around the World with Josiah Allen's Wife" by Marietta Holley
I'm going down to the crick and rest.
"Silver and Gold" by Dane Coolidge
No, he walked out of camp without a cent to his name and I picked him up Tuesday over at Furnace Crick.
"Wunpost" by Dane Coolidge
So I had to get up, stifle my cries of agony from the crick, get my revolver, and creep out stealthily to the boys' house.
"The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 25 (of 25)" by Robert Louis Stevenson
I'm dead sick of cricking my back and blistering my hands.
"Gold" by Stewart White
The pesky Injin made me walk to the crick with him an' then he told me to go home and not come back.
"With Ethan Allen at Ticonderoga" by W. Bert Foster
I went swimmin' in de crick, went wid ole Joe Brown, a-possum huntin', an' coon huntin', an' I sometimes went a-fishin'.
"Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves, North Carolina Narratives, Part 2" by Work Projects Administration
We built a fort near a big spring, an' called it an' the crick near by aftah ole Matt Houston.
"Crestlands" by Mary Addams Bayne
If ye find th' little cricks dry, head more westward an' ye'll strike th' Picketwire quicker.
"Bring Me His Ears" by Clarence E. Mulford
I think I've tramped over every foot of ground betwixt here and Overall's Crick.
"Si Klegg, Book 2 (of 6)" by John McElroy
They have the measles over on the Crick, & school's broke up.
"Si Klegg, Book 3 (of 6) Si And Shorty Meet Mr. Rosenbaum, The Spy, Who Relates His Adventures" by John McElroy
We'll have to walk you till we find a section of the crick somewhere that kin be recognized by the naked eyes.
"Si Klegg, Book 4 (of 6) Experiences Of Si And Shorty On The Great Tullahoma Campaign" by John McElroy
***

In poetry:

I wot well o' his lying
Such nights out in the cold,--
To list the cricket's crick, my sweet,
To see the glow-worm's gold.
"Dead And Gone" by Madison Julius Cawein
Fixed his clock, in the post-office--
Painted fer him, clean and slick,
'Crost his safe, in gold-leaf letters,
"J. Culwells's Wriggle Crick."
"Down On Wriggle Crick" by James Whitcomb Riley
How can they deal with city needs,
While Bungalong or Rooville pleads,
For culverts, and Wow-wow grows sick
Through want of bridges o'er its "crick?"
"Asking Too Much" by C J Dennis
Lucky he was to-night, too, for place on de crick he got,
Search on de light of day-tam, he could n't fin' better spot,
But jus' as it happen', mebbe acre or two below,
Is place w'ere de ole mail-driver’s drownin' a year ago.
"Doctor Hilaire" by William Henry Drummond
"T'orty mile crick is runnin' over de road, I’m sure,
But if you can fin' de crossin' you’ll ketch heem at Beausejour.
Sober or drunk, no matter, bring heem along you mus',
For Doctor Hilaire’s de only man of de lot for us."
"Doctor Hilaire" by William Henry Drummond
An' den I’m quiet, too scare to spik,
Wile Pierre he paddle me down de crick,
Easy an' nice he mak' her go
Close to de shore w'ere de bulrush grow,
W'ere de pike an' de beeg feesh lak to feed,
Deir nose stickin' out w'ere you see de weed--
"Keep Out Of The Weeds" by William Henry Drummond

In news:

Jared Crick is leaving the past in the past.
Texans make two more good picks with Martin, Crick in fourth round.
With their second and third picks in the fourth round, the Texans selected Michigan State receiver Keshawn Martin and Nebraska defensive Jared Crick .
James " Cubby " Hayden Owens was born February 20, 1939 in Bentley to Berry Bud and Chrystal "Crick" Neomi (Martin) Owens.
Francis Crick, shown in a 2003 photo, won the Nobel Prize for his research on the "double-helix" structure of the DNA molecule.
Michael Crick said his stepmother "never wanted to make a big fuss" about her famous double-helix drawing.
"We were expecting 300 cars," Crick said.
I read the famous "double helix" letter by James Watson and Francis Crick in Nature when it was published in 1953—I was an undergraduate at Oxford then, reading physiology and biochemistry.
Francis Crick, shown in a 2003 photo, won the Nobel Prize for his research on the "double-helix" structure of the DNA molecule.
FRANCIS CRICK AND CHRISTOF KOCH.
Francis Crick died in July 2004, age 88.
Mary Cricks, Cathy Whalen and Marcia Hand, all sisters, at Lucy Fest, which has celebrated Lucille Ball since 1991.
Whether her clients have cricks in their necks or sore backs, Pam Moses, massage therapist, never rubs them the wrong way.
Michael Crick finds out whether the contest is capturing the imagination of voters in the Thames Valley.
Michael Benjamin Lerner / Photo by Alex Crick.
***

In science:

G¨odel’s Incompleteness Theorems have the same scientific status as Einstein’s principle of relativity, Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, and Watson and Crick’s double helix model of DNA.
Incompleteness, Complexity, Randomness and Beyond
Most of these bonds form between Watson-Crick complementary bases, i.e., between A and U and between C and G, but a significant amount of bonds also form between other pairs of bases .
On Reidys and Stadler's metrics for RNA secondary structures
The third metric on Sn proposed by Reidys and Stadler is actually a general way of defining metrics, rather than a single one, and it uses Magarshak and coworkers’ algebraic representation of RNA secondary structures [3, 5, 6], recently extended in to cope with contacts other than Watson-Crick complementary base pairs.
On Reidys and Stadler's metrics for RNA secondary structures
Not only is this sense shallow, it fails to capture the directional flow of information from genotype to phenotype that is the central dogma of molecular biology (Crick, 1970).
The transmission sense of information
This fact was published for the first time by Watson and Crick in 1953 .
Position vectors of a spacelike general helices in Minkowski Space $\e_1^3$
In the early studies of molecular biology, it was proposed that the genetic code was a frozen accident (Crick 1968).
Testing Quantum Dynamics in Genetic Information Processing
Crick 1968 The origin of the genetic code. J.
Testing Quantum Dynamics in Genetic Information Processing
It is customary to call one of these strands the “Watson” strand and the other the “Crick” strand.
Biologic
We can let E −→ |C >< W | be a symbol for the process by which the environment supplies the complementary base pairs AG, T C to the Watson and Crick strands.
Biologic
Here Watson and Crick ( < W | and |C > ) are each both the machine and the blueprint for the DNA.
Biologic
Thus P and Q are really “copies” of each other in an analogy to the structural relationship of the Watson and Crick strands of the DNA.
Biologic
The hot flash is that Watson and Crick showed only two in 1953, and it was Pauling and Corey who correctly said 3, 3 years later.
Astrophysics in 2006
In the world of science, it was the year of Watson & Crick (43) and the start of the DNA era, also far from unrecognized, and Dr.
1953: An unrecognized summit in human genetic linkage analysis
In evaluating these better fit models, one should keep the words of Francis Crick in mind (loosely paraphrased): A model that fits all the data at a given time is necessarily wrong, because at any given time not all the data are correct(!). ΛCDM provides an interesting/confusing example.
Inflation: From Theory to Observation and Back
When I discussed it in 1990, I called it the best-fit Universe, and quoting Crick, I said that ΛCDM was certain to fall by the wayside .
Inflation: From Theory to Observation and Back
***