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Studding sail

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Studding sail (Naut) A light sail set at the side of a principal or square sail of a vessel in free winds, to increase her speed. Its head is bent to a small spar which is called the studding-sail boom. See Illust. of Sail.
    • ***

Usage

In literature:

She was coming along under larboard studding- sails.
"The Log of a Privateersman" by Harry Collingwood
She was stealing along swiftly before a seven knot breeze on the quarter, with studding-sails set.
"Frank Oldfield" by T.P. Wilson
No sooner did the schooner discover her, than taking in her studding-sails she hauled to the wind.
"The Three Lieutenants" by W.H.G. Kingston
Get the fore topmast, and lower studding-sails on her.
"The Pirate of the Mediterranean" by W.H.G. Kingston
Such, however, it was evidently the intention of the Frenchman not to do, for it was seen that studding-sails were being set below and aloft.
"From Powder Monkey to Admiral" by W.H.G. Kingston
We soon had the studding-sails below and aloft, still the brig did not move along as rapidly as we wished.
"The Mate of the Lily" by W. H. G. Kingston
As it was, a fore-royal was carried away and a studding-sail boom was snapt off.
"The Two Supercargoes" by W.H.G. Kingston
All this was very good advice, and the captain became quite calm and rational, and set his studding-sails below and aloft.
"Mr. Midshipman Easy" by Captain Frederick Marryat
We bore up, set all the studding sails, and ran along at the rate of eleven miles an hour.
"Peter Simple" by Frederick Marryat
When we had set the studding-sail we had nothing more to fly with; and so we stood looking.
"The Frozen Pirate" by W. Clark Russell
The squaresail and studding-sails were got up ready to hoist at an instant's notice.
"The Rival Crusoes" by W.H.G. Kingston
She had royals set, and studding-sails below and aloft on either side.
"The Heir of Kilfinnan" by W.H.G. Kingston
Up went the inner ends of the studding-sail booms.
"Down the Rhine" by Oliver Optic
The frigate's studding-sails being rigged in, she, with her prize in company, shaped a course for Sierra Leone.
"The Three Midshipmen" by W.H.G. Kingston
Consequently we never had a fair wind, to set a studding-sail, till we were within three or four days of Bahia.
"From Sail to Steam, Recollections of Naval Life" by Captain A. T. Mahan
The brig had been luffed into the wind, and everything, including studding-sails, was flat aback.
"Dick Leslie's Luck" by Harry Collingwood
One by one the studding-sails were set, and the black hull once more supported a towering mass of white canvas.
"The Ruined Cities of Zululand" by Hugh Mulleneux Walmsley
Her courses were let fall; topgallant-sails were set, studding-sails and royals soon followed.
"The Cruise of the Frolic" by W.H.G. Kingston
The breeze was light, and she was running down the coast, with all her studding sails set.
"Memoirs of Service Afloat, During the War Between the States" by Raphael Semmes
We can increase our sail; you have studding-sails, captain?
"Captain Kyd, Vol. II" by Joseph Holt Ingraham
***

In poetry:

"Oh, fly aloft to the garboard strake!
And reef the spanker boom;
Bend a studding sail on the martingale,
To give her weather room."
"A Sailor's Yarn" by James Jeffrey Roche
Then the whale piped high a leviathan cry
And he guggled in huge despair;
Then he splattered our sail and stud on his tail
And turned nine flips in the air.
"What Ho! She Blows!" by Wallace Irwin