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Refluent

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • a Refluent Flowing back; returning; ebbing. "And refluent through the pass of fear
      The battle's tide was poured."
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • refluent Flowing or surging back; ebbing: as, the refluent tide.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • adj Refluent ref′lōō-ent flowing back: ebbing
    • n Refluent a flowing back: ebb
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. refluens, p. pr. of refluere, to flow back; pref. re-, re- + fluere, to flow. See Flurent

Usage

In literature:

Back on my soul in refluent surges sweep.
"The Oedipus Trilogy" by Sophocles
Too languid to sting, he had the more venom refluent in his blood.
"Middlemarch" by George Eliot
The invasion was beginning again, but with a refluent movement.
"The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse" by Vicente Blasco Ibanez
A chip cast ashore in a refluent eddy tells no tale of the force and swiftness of the current.
"Backlog Studies" by Charles Dudley Warner
When the muscles of the heart cease to act, the refluent blood again distends or elongates them; and thus irritated they contract as before.
"Zoonomia, Vol. I" by Erasmus Darwin
All the material had been carried out to sea by the refluent wave.
"Among the Forces" by Henry White Warren
The bows scarce reached, the rope Saturnia rends, And down the refluent tide the loosened ship descends.
"The Aeneid of Virgil" by Virgil
Under the ceaseless fire of iron and lead the refluent waves came pouring back.
"Lights and Shadows in Confederate Prisons" by Homer B. Sprague
The ship surged backward before the great refluent wave of its movement.
"Cedar Creek" by Elizabeth Hely Walshe
We know some barrier checks their wonted course, When refluent waters seek again their source.
"The Birth of the War-God" by Kalidasa
There feeling the tremendous refluent wave, she went careening over and over toward the sunken reef.
"The Columbia River" by William Denison Lyman
***

In poetry:

I wrote my name upon the sand,
And trusted it would stand for aye;
But, soon, alas! the refluent sea
Had washed my feeble lines away.
"Carving A Name" by Horatio Alger Jr
What secret strive ye thus to hide,
A thousand fathoms deep,
Which the sea will not keep,
And pours, and babbles forth upon her refluent tide?—
"By the Seashore at Night" by Kate Seymour Maclean
The sunset at its radiant heart
Had somewhat unconfest:
The bird was loath of speech, its song
Half-refluent on its breast,
And made melodious toyings with
A note or two at best.
"After Her Going" by Francis Thompson
Once melodies of street-cries washed these walls,
Glad as the refluent song
Of cheerful waters from a happy spring
That shout their way along;
Such cries were born in other days from lips
A spirit taught to sing. Now it is gone!
"Eclipse" by William Hervey Allen Jr
Nor BEDFORD will my friend survey
The book of Nature with unheeding eye;
For never beams the rising orb of day,
For never dimly dies the refluent ray,
But as the moralizer marks the sky,
He broods with strange delight upon futurity.
"Birth-Day Ode 02" by Robert Southey
For as the wave of the sea, upheaving in long undulations,
Plunges loud on the sands, pauses, and turns, and retreats,
So the Hexameter, rising and singing, with cadence sonorous,
Falls; and in refluent rhythm back the Pentameter flows.
"In The Harbour: Elegiac Verse" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow