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Incommodity

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Incommodity Inconvenience; trouble; annoyance; disadvantage; encumbrance. "A great incommodity to the body.""Buried him under a bulk of incommodities ."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n incommodity Inconvenience; trouble; disadvantage.
    • n incommodity That which is incommodious or troublesome; anything that incommodes or causes loss; an inconvenience; a trouble.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Incommodity anything which causes inconvenience
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. incommoditas,: cf. F. incommodité,. See Incommodious
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—L. incommodāreincommodus, inconvenient—in, not, commodus, commodious.

Usage

In literature:

During the night he had fancied he could recognise the voice of M. Vigneron, whom the heat doubtless had incommoded.
"Lourdes From the "Three Cities"" by Emile Zola
During the night he had fancied he could recognise the voice of M. Vigneron, whom the heat doubtless had incommoded.
"The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete Lourdes, Rome and Paris" by Emile Zola
While pounding the chillies, wear glasses to save your eyes from being incommoded by them.
"Directions for Cookery, in its Various Branches" by Eliza Leslie
He says the entrance is much incommoded with shoals, and so narrow in some places as not to exceed the length of a ship.
"A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. II" by Robert Kerr
The moisture that incommoded him appeared not to be tears, but sweat.
"Caleb Williams" by William Godwin
I mean I hope you were not much incommoded by the night air, ma'am.
"The Castle Inn" by Stanley John Weyman
The summer was now far advanced, and never, during its progress, had we been incommoded by any very hot weather.
"A Narrative of a Nine Months' Residence in New Zealand in 1827" by Augustus Earle
M. de Mayenne, who was incommoded by a sciatica, followed as best he could, but some way behind, dragging his limbs after him very heavily.
"A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times Volume V. of VI." by Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot
It extremely incommoded her yesterday.
"Clarissa, Or The History Of A Young Lady, Volume 8" by Samuel Richardson
The ladies were incommoded and complained of broken sleep.
"The Book of Dreams and Ghosts" by Andrew Lang
Mrs. Lancaster gave a shrug of impatience, and pushed a photograph on a small table farther away, as if it incommoded her.
"Gordon Keith" by Thomas Nelson Page
Here, however, he was perhaps even more incommoded than he had been before.
"Santa Claus's Partner" by Thomas Nelson Page
And here a singular incommodity befell one member of our party.
"Atlantic Monthly, Vol. XII. July, 1863, No. LXIX." by Various
A thick coating of hair prevents its being wet, or otherwise incommoded by the water.
"Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Vol IV. No. XX. January, 1852." by Various
On awaking I felt myself incommoded by some object upon which I lay; and removing it, found it to be a bone.
"The American Indians" by Henry R. Schoolcraft
On awaking I felt myself incommoded by some object upon which I lay; and removing it, found it to be a bone.
"Western Scenes and Reminiscences" by Henry Rowe Schoolcraft
Dr. Orkborne, much incommoded by this second interruption, coldly begged to know his pleasure.
"Camilla" by Fanny Burney
It incommoded her in her climb; it caught in the prongs of rock.
"In the Roar of the Sea" by Sabine Baring-Gould
If a door or window happens to be open in the room in summer time, we should ask of visitors, if it incommodes them.
"The Gentleman and Lady's Book of Politeness and Propriety of Deportment, Dedicated to the Youth of Both Sexes" by Elisabeth Celnart
Belovedest, even if thine aunt Curtis should stay a week, do not thou incommode thy mother and sisters by trying to arrange a meeting.
"Love Letters of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Volume I (of 2)" by Nathaniel Hawthorne
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