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Diluvium

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Diluvium (Geol) A deposit of superficial loam, sand, gravel, stones, etc., caused by former action of flowing waters, or the melting of glacial ice.☞ The accumulation of matter by the ordinary operation of water is termed alluvium.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n diluvium A deluge or an inundation; an overflowing.
    • n diluvium Coarse detrital material, wherever found: a term introduced into geology in consequence of a general belief in the past occurrence of a universal deluge. Finer materials, usually occupying the lower parts of valleys, and occurring especially along the courses of great rivers, were called alluvium (which see). In the use of the words diluvium and alluvium (diluvial, alluvial) there is an obscure recognition of a fundamental fact in geology, namely, that rivers have been gradually diminishing in volume, a condition which necessarily connects itself with diminished erosive power. But the idea of a catastrophic period of diluvial action, preceded and followed by repose, such as lies at the base of the belief in the deluge, is no longer in vogue, and the word diluvium has become almost obsolete except among German geologists.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Diluvium dil-ū′vi-um an inundation or flood:
    • n Diluvium dil-ū′vi-um (geol.) a deposit of sand, gravel, &c. made by extraordinary currents of water—also Dilū′vion
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. diluvium,. See Dilute Deluge
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. diluviumdiluĕre.

Usage

In literature:

By the way, how do you and Buckland account for the "tails" of diluvium in Scotland?
"More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II" by Charles Darwin
We travelled over land equal to any that we had seen, a deep black diluvium with grass three or four feet high, and thinly-timbered.
"A Source Book Of Australian History" by Compiled by Gwendolen H. Swinburne
The term "diluvium" was for a time the popular name of the boulder formation, because it was referred by some geologists to the deluge.
"A Manual of Elementary Geology" by Charles Lyell
Diluvium, the time when the glacial beds were deposited.
"A Manual of the Antiquity of Man" by J. P. MacLean
The heavy deposit of diluvium conceals the surface.
"Scenes and Adventures in the Semi-Alpine Region of the Ozark Mountains of Missouri and Arkansas" by Henry Rowe Schoolcraft
Whence then, it may be asked, the masses of compact reddish clay and pebble diluvium, which exist?
"The American Indians" by Henry R. Schoolcraft
Whence then, it may be asked, the masses of compact reddish clay and pebble diluvium, which exist?
"Western Scenes and Reminiscences" by Henry Rowe Schoolcraft
Whence then, it may be asked, the masses of compact reddish clay and pebble diluvium, which exist?
"The Indian in his Wigwam" by Henry R. Schoolcraft
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