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Contraband of war

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Contraband of war that which, according to international law, cannot be supplied to a hostile belligerent except at the risk of seizure and condemnation by the aggrieved belligerent.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Contraband of war a name applied to certain commodities, as military stores, and even coal in an age of war steamers, not to be supplied by neutral to belligerent powers
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Sp. contrabanda—It. contrabbando—L. contra, against, L. L. bandum, ban.

Usage

In literature:

What is contraband of war?
"The World War and What was Behind It" by Louis P. Benezet
The searching of the train for articles contraband of war was then a new feature.
"Camp-Fire and Cotton-Field" by Thomas W. Knox
What is contraband of war?
"A Short History of the United States" by Edward Channing
We are after a schooner bound for somewhere south, laden with contraband of war.
"Fitz the Filibuster" by George Manville Fenn
More than that, Statia became the center for contraband of war.
"Plotting in Pirate Seas" by Francis Rolt-Wheeler
The arms are contraband of war, and if it were known that they were in England it would be the duty of the authorities to seize them.
"In Direst Peril" by David Christie Murray
The monasteries were looked upon as contraband of war.
"Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Volume 11 (of 14)" by Elbert Hubbard
Contraband of war, IV.
"History of the United States, Volume 6 (of 6)" by E. Benjamin Andrews
They might surely consider the canoe as freighted with goods which were contraband of war.
"The Adventures of the Chevalier De La Salle and His Companions, in Their Explorations of the Prairies, Forests, Lakes, and Rivers, of the New World, and Their Interviews with the Savage Tribes, Two Hundred Years Ago" by John S. C. Abbott
Munitions and other contraband of war might be quietly sent off with fuel to fighting ships.
"Brandon of the Engineers" by Harold Bindloss
Contraband in time of war.
"The Sailor's Word-Book" by William Henry Smyth
Third, neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under an enemy's flag.
"A History of the Nineteenth Century, Year by Year" by Edwin Emerson
The junks were taken into Dalny, where their cargoes were declared to be contraband of war, and confiscated by the Japanese.
"Under the Ensign of the Rising Sun" by Harry Collingwood
He argued at length on the question of conditional and absolute contraband of war.
"International Incidents for Discussion in Conversation Classes" by Lassa Oppenheim
The days of clumsy blockades are over, just as are the starvation purposes of contraband of war.
"The Men Who Wrought" by Ridgwell Cullum
General B.F. Butler, in May 1861, declared negro slaves contraband of war.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 11, Slice 3" by Various
The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war; 3.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 7, Slice 10" by Various
She did not fail to make the League acquainted with her displeasure, even threatening to treat its cargoes as contraband of war.
"The Hansa Towns" by Helen Zimmern
Hamlyn isn't injuring church people, he is giving contraband of war to infidelity.
"A Lost Cause" by Cyril Arthur Edward Ranger Gull
Medicine had been declared contraband of war by the Federal Government, and salt works were made a special object for attack.
"The Dixie Book of Days" by Matthew Page Andrews
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In news:

Gen Benjamin F Butler interviewing the three runaway slaves -- traditionally identified as Shepard Mallory, Frank Baker and James Townsend -- who sparked his landmark May 24, 1861 decision to give such slaves refuge as "contraband of war.".
Hampton slaves asylum as " contraband of war" 150 years ago.
Few people imagined the consequences when Fort Monroe commander Benjamin F Butler gave three Hampton slaves asylum as "contraband of war" 150 years ago.
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